Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

baldymcgee6

  • 3 years ago

The equation x^2y+2xy^3=8 defines y as a function of x, y=f(x), near x=2, y =1. Find the slope of the curve x^2y+2xy^3=8 when x=2, y=1

  • This Question is Closed
  1. myininaya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Do you know how to find the derivative?

  2. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yeah, do we just find the derivative and plug in the points?

  3. myininaya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes find the derivative of both sides with respect to x And then replace x with 2 and y with 1

  4. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What does this part of the question mean? y=f(x), near x=2, y =1.

  5. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it means that the curve itself might not represent a function, because it does not pass the "vertical line test" but "locally" it is a function, that is, near the point it does represent a function hello @myininaya!

  6. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    in practical value, you can ignore that statement and proceed as myininaya said

  7. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ahh, thank you satellite, makes more sense now.

  8. myininaya
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    But this point isn't even on the curve.....

  9. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @myininaya \[2xy+x^2y'+2y^3+2x3y^2y' = 0\] I got this when I differentiated both sides, but how do I get y'?

  10. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @satellite73 ?

  11. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Nevermind, got it! Thanks guys

  12. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy