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rvgupta Group Title

Does the speed of light slow down near heavier objects? if yes, Explain

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. damrinder Group Title
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    yes dear specially when it passes close to a very huge heavy object like sun or close to a star ..

    • 2 years ago
  2. Nasir2012 Group Title
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    The space fibers, as per the Einstein, is curved around the massive objects. so every thing passing near a massive object get curved as per the curvature around the object. and this is why an object revolves around other. it only changes its direction

    • 2 years ago
  3. goformit100 Group Title
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    \[3*10^8\]

    • 2 years ago
  4. Algebraic! Group Title
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    the speed doesn't change, but space is curved around massive objects, so it has to travel a longer path and therefore takes more time (which has the net effect of seeming to 'slow' it)

    • 2 years ago
  5. kappa007 Group Title
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    The speed of light will change only if the Refractive Index of the medium it's travelling in, changes. Near massive objects , I think the previous explanation is good.

    • 2 years ago
  6. jasonxx Group Title
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    agreed, speed of light remains constant till there exists no change in medium

    • 2 years ago
  7. Algebraic! Group Title
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    the speed of light is actually constant in any medium, it's just that due to scattering the path it must take through different materials is very different in length.

    • 2 years ago
  8. jasonxx Group Title
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    sorry, this concept is quite alien to me and i must say, speed changes if medium is changed

    • 2 years ago
  9. kappa007 Group Title
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    If the speed didn't change we would never have been able to detect neutrinos. (Cheronkov radiation)

    • 2 years ago
  10. jasonxx Group Title
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    we must thank @kappa007 for this piece of wisdom

    • 2 years ago
  11. kappa007 Group Title
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    also, then R.I. of all media would be 1.

    • 2 years ago
  12. kappa007 Group Title
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    :)

    • 2 years ago
  13. Algebraic! Group Title
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    oh aye? well what causes light to 'slow down' in a material? magic? or is it all that gravity from all those protons and neutrons

    • 2 years ago
  14. jasonxx Group Title
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    @Algebraic! if you've got concept then only entertain else don't mislead or misguide in a funny manner

    • 2 years ago
  15. Algebraic! Group Title
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    l2english

    • 2 years ago
  16. kappa007 Group Title
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    Still, you can't compare that with gravitational lensing. If we dig down to the basics of refraction.. I think the slowing down maybe because of interaction between light's electromagnetic field and the medium's e.m. field.

    • 2 years ago
  17. Algebraic! Group Title
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    no kidding. absorption and re-emission. ie scattering

    • 2 years ago
  18. kappa007 Group Title
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    can you explain please.

    • 2 years ago
  19. Algebraic! Group Title
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    read the wiki page or something.

    • 2 years ago
  20. jasonxx Group Title
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    The speed of light does not decrease. Anything moving at the speed of light stays at the speed of light and cannot be slowed down (unless you want to talk about "tachyons" that may or may not exist)..... When light passes through a medium the particles of light, photons, do not change speed. The wavelength of light though, does change. There is a simple relation that you can follow (wavelength in medium) = (wavelength in vacuum) / (index of refraction of medium) What is really slowing the photons down is their interaction with the particles in the medium, which shortens the wavelength. The photons themselves though still are moving at the speed of light, it is just this interaction that causes the dilation. so i don't think scattering makes any sense, it's just a blunder. or may be i am wrong

    • 2 years ago
  21. jasonxx Group Title
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    hope this help you

    • 2 years ago
  22. kappa007 Group Title
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    I'll say that, 'c' is indeed constant but not exactly the speed of light, as, the basic R.I. definition is based on such speeds only. During interaction with particles , light tends to behave as a particle. So, I think the photon-particle interaction thing must be the reason.

    • 2 years ago
  23. jasonxx Group Title
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    speed always remain constant, it's just interaction that acts as obstacle slowing down the speed

    • 2 years ago
  24. Algebraic! Group Title
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scattering learn all about it here.

    • 2 years ago
  25. jasonxx Group Title
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    nice to know, people believe in wikipedia

    • 2 years ago
  26. kappa007 Group Title
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    there's no term = 'speed' in the page suggested. I

    • 2 years ago
  27. Algebraic! Group Title
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    rfl

    • 2 years ago
  28. jasonxx Group Title
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    lol

    • 2 years ago
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