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zhiyuan3yu5

  • 3 years ago

find limit of ysin(1/(x^4+y^4)) as (x,y)--->(0,0)

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  1. WhiiteRussian
    • 3 years ago
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    It would just be 0

  2. WhiiteRussian
    • 3 years ago
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    Using L'hopitals rule

  3. WhiiteRussian
    • 3 years ago
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    Understand?

  4. mukushla
    • 3 years ago
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    note that\[\sin(\frac{1}{x^4+y^4})\]is a limited function between -1 and 1 whatever x,y are so we have a limited function multiplying zero (because y->0) and\[\lim_{(x,y) \rightarrow(0,0)} y \ \sin(\frac{1}{x^4+y^4})=\lim_{y \rightarrow 0} \times\lim_{(x,y) \rightarrow(0,0)} \sin(\frac{1}{x^4+y^4})=0\times \text{limited}=0\]make sense???

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