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rawrrainbowsz2

  • 3 years ago

1/3y + 1/4 =5/12

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  1. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350228174103:dw|

  2. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    do i simplfy ?

  3. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    you would need common denominators, before you do anything. Do you know how to do that? I can walk you through it if you're not familiar with that

  4. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    yea one min

  5. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350228511155:dw|

  6. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    almost So it's \[\frac{4}{12}y+\frac{3}{12}=\frac{5}{12}\] because \[\frac44\cdot \frac{1}{3}y+\frac33 \cdot \frac{1}{4}=\frac{5}{12}\]

  7. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    does that make sense?

  8. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    so 5/12 stays the same ?

  9. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    yes because it already has the common denominator of 12. We're trying to make it so that all the numbers have 12 on the bottom

  10. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    now we can solve for y

  11. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    ok im re writing it

  12. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350228980674:dw|

  13. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    i got stuck

  14. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\frac{4}{12}y+\frac{3}{12}=\frac{5}{12}\] ok now we need to get \[\frac3{12}\] over to the right hand side of the equal sign so subtract \[\frac3{12}\] from both sides \[\frac{4}{12}y+\cancel{\frac{3}{12}-\frac3{12}}=\frac{5}{12}-\frac3{12}\]

  15. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    4/12y =2/12

  16. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    yes!

  17. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    now we need to get the y out of the denominator. do you know how to do that?

  18. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    multiply ?

  19. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    wait, is y in the denominator or is it just like this: \[\frac4{12}y =\frac2{12}\]

  20. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    was this the original equation? \[\frac{4}{12}y+\frac{3}{12}=\frac{5}{12}\] or this \[\frac{4}{12y}+\frac{3}{12}=\frac{5}{12}\] ?

  21. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    the 1st one

  22. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry i've been mistyping let's try that again LOL

  23. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\frac{4}{12}y=\frac{2}{12}\] now we can multiply both sides by \[\frac{12}1\] to get rid of the 12 in the denominator because we don't need it anymore. It makes it easier to solve for y this way so \[\frac{12}1 \cdot \frac{4}{12}y=\frac{12}1 \cdot \frac{2}{12}\]

  24. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    is it 2 ? :D

  25. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    almost so we're left with 4y=2 so what does y=?

  26. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    2 .....

  27. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    \[y=\frac24\]

  28. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    :( i was close

  29. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    because we have to divide by 4 to get y by itself

  30. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    Yep you were almost there! so now you just need to simplify \[\frac24\]

  31. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    ohhh ok lol

  32. rawrrainbowsz2
    • 3 years ago
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    1/2

  33. JenniferSmart1
    • 3 years ago
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    \[y=\frac12\] very good!

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