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tessax

  • 3 years ago

I don't just want the answer. I'm just confused as to the steps for this... :/ can someone help please? -2/5x - 9 <9/10 ?

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  1. vivalakoda
    • 3 years ago
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    To get x by itself, you have to get rid of the nine, so add nine to both sides. Now what do you have?

  2. tessax
    • 3 years ago
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    Thanks :)

  3. vivalakoda
    • 3 years ago
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    You already figured it out? :p

  4. tessax
    • 3 years ago
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    Would it be -2/5 < 9/10 then?

  5. vivalakoda
    • 3 years ago
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    No... you are solving for x, correct?

  6. jayz657
    • 3 years ago
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    -2/5x < 9/10 + 9 -2/5x < 99/10 -2x < 99/10 (5) -2x < 99/2 x < -99/4

  7. tessax
    • 3 years ago
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    Yeah I am

  8. vivalakoda
    • 3 years ago
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    -2/5x - 9 <9/10 is the original equation. Now you add nine to both sides to get rid of the nine. (-2/5x-9)+9 < (9/10) +9. Simplify now you have -2/5x < 9 9/10 Now to get rid of the fraction -2/5, multiply both sides by 5 You now have -2x < 40 9/10 Then to get x by itself, divide both sides by -2. Remember that when you divide an inequality by a negative number the sign switches, so the equation is now: x> 20 9/10

  9. tessax
    • 3 years ago
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    Thanks soo much! :)

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