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baldymcgee6

  • 3 years ago

Is taking the derivative of e^x technically using the exponential rule?

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  1. jayz657
    • 3 years ago
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    derivative of e^x is e^x, it doesnt change not power rule if thats what you mean

  2. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
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    I know what the derivative of e^x is, that's not what I asked.

  3. jayz657
    • 3 years ago
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    theres no such thing as an exponetial rule btw

  4. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
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    @jayz657 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differentiation_rules#Derivatives_of_exponential_and_logarithmic_functions

  5. jayz657
    • 3 years ago
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    that link shows derivatives of exponential functions there is no rule for it, all you need to know about derivatives of e^x is e^x or if your talk about functions like 2^x then you need to log the function so you could bring down the x and take derivative of it

  6. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
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    would you agree that \[d/dx(2^x) = 2^xln(2)\]

  7. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
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    @jayz657

  8. jayz657
    • 3 years ago
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    yea doing derivatives of y= 2^x is different from e^x since you dont need to do logs for e^x ln(y) = xln(2) 1/y dy/dx = ln(2) dy/dx = yln(2) y' = 2^x ln(2)

  9. AccessDenied
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, this is just a specific case for the exponential rule: \(\large \frac{d}{dx}(e^x) = e^x \ln e = e^x * 1 = e^x \)

  10. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
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    Thank you @AccessDenied

  11. AccessDenied
    • 3 years ago
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    You're welcome. :)

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