Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

mathslover

  • 3 years ago

What is exactly golden ratio?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Colcaps
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you want explaining or you wanna know what it is?

  2. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I wanna know what it is.

  3. estudier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1350296531363:dw|

  4. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Why is it known as golden ratio? What is "exactly golden ratio? What are its applications in everyday life, and other things? Who invented it?

  5. Colcaps
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_ratio

  6. estudier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Greeks, pops up all over the place....

  7. Colcaps
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah diagrams and dimensions use golden ratio

  8. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    golden ratio was not invented, it was discovered

  9. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I have to make a chart and a file for it, so what exactly should I write there ? lol, @UnkleRhaukus sorry, Who discovered it? :)

  10. Colcaps
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Michael Maestlin

  11. Colcaps
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    or Ancient Greeks

  12. estudier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    "golden ratio was not invented, it was discovered" Debatable.

  13. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it can be measured @estudier

  14. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I am making a project on it!

  15. estudier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    1+1/1+/1+/1+/1...... = GR

  16. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the limit of the ratio of consecutive fibonacci numbers

  17. estudier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Convergents of 1+1/1+/1+/1+/1......are ratios of successive F numbers

  18. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sorry to say but : NOT getting it.

  19. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\color{blue}{\large{\phi}}=\color{red}{\LARGE{GR}}\]?is it so ?

  20. calculusfunctions
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    @mathslover A line segment which is divided into two segments, with a greater length α and a smaller length β such that the length of α + β is to α as α is to β, is divided into the golden ratio. Hence\[\frac{ \alpha +\beta }{ \alpha }=\frac{ \alpha }{ }\]and\[(\frac{ \alpha }{ \beta })^{2}-\frac{ \alpha }{ \beta }-1=0\]where the positive solution for\[\frac{ \alpha }{ \beta }=\frac{ \sqrt{5}+1 }{ 2 }=\frac{ 2 }{ \sqrt{5}-1 }\]FYI It is also called the golden section or the divine section.

  21. estudier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Notice that the Greeks messed about with this without worrying about the radical (they worried only about the ratio)

  22. calculusfunctions
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    @mathslover do you understand?

  23. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Understood! Thanks a lot!

  24. calculusfunctions
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    @mathslover You welcome. I thought you didn't like my explanation. lol

  25. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Not exactly like your thought, but I think it will take time for me to completely understand it!

  26. calculusfunctions
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    By the way, I just noticed that in my explanation, there is a β missing in the denominator of the right side of the first equation.

  27. calculusfunctions
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    @mathslover is this something you're learning in school right now?

  28. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1) That was a small mistake, sir, no problem for that. 2) Actually,NO sir, I am in 9th class and their is no such thing so far as I know at least in school learning upto 12th class. But though, I am told to make a project (file,charts) related to mathematics interesting discovery (any) . I chose, golden ratio as my topic for project as it is applicable, understandable etc, A good topic for project, actually, I think!

  29. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Usually there are no such things that I have ever seen in the textbooks but ^those studies of new discoveries are very important! Thanks for helping me out!

  30. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zosU6XTgSY ^ is khanacademy video good for understanding golden ratio further?

  31. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    also watch parthenon reconstruction project video, you may google...

  32. calculusfunctions
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    @mathslover I've never checked those videos out. Perhaps I will when I have time.

  33. cwrw238
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    one thing i read about the golden ratio was it = height of human / height of his/her navel!! not sure if i believe that - lol! seems a bit bizarre...

  34. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lol I never checked that, may be interesting!

  35. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ideal human form.. in anatomy they use that i think

  36. estudier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    http://www.vali.de/archives/1117

  37. mathslover
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ^ interesting

  38. calculusfunctions
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    @estudier that's a wonderful recommendation. Thanks! It is true that the golden ratio can be observed in nature.

  39. lharrell97
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a logarithmic spiral, also known at golden ratio or golden spiral, is a spiral curve that is often found in nature. for example, the little diamond shaped sections on the outside of a pineapple are actually spiraling upwards at a constant angle. another example is the angle of descent of a hawk towards it's prey.

  40. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy