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mathslover

What is exactly golden ratio?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Colcaps
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    you want explaining or you wanna know what it is?

    • one year ago
  2. mathslover
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    I wanna know what it is.

    • one year ago
  3. estudier
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    |dw:1350296531363:dw|

    • one year ago
  4. mathslover
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    Why is it known as golden ratio? What is "exactly golden ratio? What are its applications in everyday life, and other things? Who invented it?

    • one year ago
  5. Colcaps
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_ratio

    • one year ago
  6. estudier
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    Greeks, pops up all over the place....

    • one year ago
  7. Colcaps
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    yeah diagrams and dimensions use golden ratio

    • one year ago
  8. UnkleRhaukus
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    golden ratio was not invented, it was discovered

    • one year ago
  9. mathslover
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    I have to make a chart and a file for it, so what exactly should I write there ? lol, @UnkleRhaukus sorry, Who discovered it? :)

    • one year ago
  10. Colcaps
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    Michael Maestlin

    • one year ago
  11. Colcaps
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    or Ancient Greeks

    • one year ago
  12. estudier
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    "golden ratio was not invented, it was discovered" Debatable.

    • one year ago
  13. UnkleRhaukus
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    it can be measured @estudier

    • one year ago
  14. mathslover
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    I am making a project on it!

    • one year ago
  15. estudier
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    1+1/1+/1+/1+/1...... = GR

    • one year ago
  16. UnkleRhaukus
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    the limit of the ratio of consecutive fibonacci numbers

    • one year ago
  17. estudier
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    Convergents of 1+1/1+/1+/1+/1......are ratios of successive F numbers

    • one year ago
  18. mathslover
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    sorry to say but : NOT getting it.

    • one year ago
  19. mathslover
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    \[\color{blue}{\large{\phi}}=\color{red}{\LARGE{GR}}\]?is it so ?

    • one year ago
  20. calculusfunctions
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    @mathslover A line segment which is divided into two segments, with a greater length α and a smaller length β such that the length of α + β is to α as α is to β, is divided into the golden ratio. Hence\[\frac{ \alpha +\beta }{ \alpha }=\frac{ \alpha }{ }\]and\[(\frac{ \alpha }{ \beta })^{2}-\frac{ \alpha }{ \beta }-1=0\]where the positive solution for\[\frac{ \alpha }{ \beta }=\frac{ \sqrt{5}+1 }{ 2 }=\frac{ 2 }{ \sqrt{5}-1 }\]FYI It is also called the golden section or the divine section.

    • one year ago
  21. estudier
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    Notice that the Greeks messed about with this without worrying about the radical (they worried only about the ratio)

    • one year ago
  22. calculusfunctions
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    @mathslover do you understand?

    • one year ago
  23. mathslover
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    Understood! Thanks a lot!

    • one year ago
  24. calculusfunctions
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    @mathslover You welcome. I thought you didn't like my explanation. lol

    • one year ago
  25. mathslover
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    Not exactly like your thought, but I think it will take time for me to completely understand it!

    • one year ago
  26. calculusfunctions
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    By the way, I just noticed that in my explanation, there is a β missing in the denominator of the right side of the first equation.

    • one year ago
  27. calculusfunctions
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    @mathslover is this something you're learning in school right now?

    • one year ago
  28. mathslover
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    1) That was a small mistake, sir, no problem for that. 2) Actually,NO sir, I am in 9th class and their is no such thing so far as I know at least in school learning upto 12th class. But though, I am told to make a project (file,charts) related to mathematics interesting discovery (any) . I chose, golden ratio as my topic for project as it is applicable, understandable etc, A good topic for project, actually, I think!

    • one year ago
  29. mathslover
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    Usually there are no such things that I have ever seen in the textbooks but ^those studies of new discoveries are very important! Thanks for helping me out!

    • one year ago
  30. mathslover
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zosU6XTgSY ^ is khanacademy video good for understanding golden ratio further?

    • one year ago
  31. ganeshie8
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    also watch parthenon reconstruction project video, you may google...

    • one year ago
  32. calculusfunctions
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    @mathslover I've never checked those videos out. Perhaps I will when I have time.

    • one year ago
  33. cwrw238
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    one thing i read about the golden ratio was it = height of human / height of his/her navel!! not sure if i believe that - lol! seems a bit bizarre...

    • one year ago
  34. mathslover
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    lol I never checked that, may be interesting!

    • one year ago
  35. ganeshie8
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    ideal human form.. in anatomy they use that i think

    • one year ago
  36. estudier
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    http://www.vali.de/archives/1117

    • one year ago
  37. mathslover
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    ^ interesting

    • one year ago
  38. calculusfunctions
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    @estudier that's a wonderful recommendation. Thanks! It is true that the golden ratio can be observed in nature.

    • one year ago
  39. lharrell97
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    a logarithmic spiral, also known at golden ratio or golden spiral, is a spiral curve that is often found in nature. for example, the little diamond shaped sections on the outside of a pineapple are actually spiraling upwards at a constant angle. another example is the angle of descent of a hawk towards it's prey.

    • one year ago
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