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ceciliagodina

Any advice to improve my english skills?, I really need a good score on my TOEFL ibt test

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. InYourHead
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    Well, you spoke perfect English there! Is there anything about English that you're not sure you completely understand?

    • one year ago
  2. ceciliagodina
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    I´m not sure about what to improve, I think english in general, because last time it´s was so hard to me to get concentrated about reading, and some questions are tricky , I get 71 points and I need 94 points 24 reading / writing 23 listening / speaking

    • one year ago
  3. InYourHead
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    Okay. Well, let me take what you just told me, and make a couple of corrections. How about that? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ When you said, "...because last time it´s was so hard to me to get concentrated about reading," you can actually say, instead, "...because last time, IT was so hard FOR me TO CONCENTRATE ON reading." (I capitalized the parts that can be corrected.) ~~~~~~~~~~~ I know it's not much, but I could at least tell you about contractions. The word "it's" actually means "it is." When we put the word "it" and "is" together, we can say "it's." You get it? So, in English, you don't need to say "it's was," because that would mean "it is was." And that doesn't make much sense, right? ~~~~~~~~~~~ Whenever we're talking about difficult, or ease, we use the word "for," and not "to." For example: You can say, "English is hard for me," or, "English is easy for me." We never use the word "to" when we're taking about how easy or hard it is for somebody. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    • one year ago
  4. ceciliagodina
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    I get it! So, I think that I also need some grammar help for my writing skills. Can I ask, when and where to use: "at" "on" "in"

    • one year ago
  5. order
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    Those are all transitional words. What in particular are you unsure about with these words? Examples of the use of these words are: I'm at the station, I'm sitting at the table, or I'm at the park. (So you're saying you're standing next/sitting next to, are by/beside, or are "at" some place) I'm standing on the table, I'm sitting on the chair I'm on the ride. (So you're saying you're on top of something ~ not at/next to or underneath it...) I'm in the swimming pool, I'm in the living room, I'm in the park. (meaning you're literally in the place... like in a pool, swimming in the water... or in a park, when you're actually walking through/in it and not next to it, like when you're at the park) If you need more help, please feel free to ask :)

    • one year ago
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