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AmberCat21

  • 3 years ago

1/2x=15

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  1. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Multiply both sides by 2.

  2. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    And you're done.

  3. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    why 2?

  4. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    OK, let's think of it this way: divide both sides by \(\large {1 \over 2}\).

  5. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    and what do u mean multiply?

  6. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Multiplication... is... the... basic... thing... they... teach... you... in... multiplication... tables.

  7. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Remember this? 2 x 1 = 2 2 x 2 = 4 2 x 3 = 6 2 x 4 = 8 2 x 5 = 10 2 x 6 = 12

  8. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Basically, you just wanna get the \(\rm x\) alone.

  9. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    i'm sorry why do we multiply 2 to both sides is what i meant ;)

  10. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Think of it this way: we must divide both sides by \(\Large {1 \over 2}\) which just means multiplying 2. Right?

  11. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    yes

  12. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    we multiply x by 2?

  13. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Both sides.

  14. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    can u demonstrate?

  15. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\rm {1 \over 2}x\cdot 2 = {15 \cdot 2} \]

  16. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    then the answer will be?

  17. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    \[15 \cdot 2\]

  18. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    ok..so WHAT IF 1/2x is equals to 3..and it will look like 3/2=30?

  19. jazy
    • 3 years ago
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    What do mean if (1/2)x = 3? You multiplied by 2 in order to isolate the x...to let it alone on one side. So: \[x = 15 \times 2\]

  20. AmberCat21
    • 3 years ago
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    why do we multiply it with 2 then?

  21. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    As said above, we divide by one-half which is the same as multiplying 2.

  22. jazy
    • 3 years ago
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    To UNDO the (1/2)x we multiply by 2. We want to solve for x, find it's value. So we need it isolated on one side.

  23. jazy
    • 3 years ago
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    Once you multiply by 2, the (1/2) is gone.

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