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lgbasallote

  • 3 years ago

how to write summation (complete with the limits thing)

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  1. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    `\(\sum_{a}^{b}\)` will give u \(\sum_{a}^{b}\)

  2. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    no not like that

  3. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    then ?

  4. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    see satellite's comments http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/507e8b8be4b0599919841e26

  5. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\sum_{a = 1}^{\infty}a\]

  6. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    And if you wanna write it inline, then use \limits.\(\sum \limits_{a = 1}^{\infty}a\)

  7. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    @hartnn The correct code for inline is given below: ``` \(\sum \limits_{a}^{b}\) ```

  8. freewilly922
    • 3 years ago
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    you can also use \displaystyle in from of it so \displaystyle\sum_{i=1}^n gives \[\displaystyle\sum_{i+1}^n\] It also works for \lim, \prod etc.

  9. freewilly922
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\displaystyle \lim_{h\to 0} \] \displaystyle\lim_{h\to 0}

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