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frankdpnw

  • 3 years ago

#Mooc question In exercise 1.4, MIT6_189IAP11_hw1.pdf, how do I code for a 4th root in python. The problem that I am struggling with is finding the 4th root of -19+100. I know the answer but I don't know how to code it. I used the math.sqrt for one of the earlier problems.

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  1. senior_caliente
    • 3 years ago
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    I had the same question http://openstudy.com/study?login#/updates/507db758e4b0eba0db5e9c9e Best way is use ** operator with 1/4

  2. frankdpnw
    • 3 years ago
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    Thank you. That works

  3. jhstephenson
    • 3 years ago
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    I did X**.25

  4. peterdb
    • 3 years ago
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    I puzzled over this wondering if Python had some special way to solve it. I then remembered that a root is the same as the exponential of the reciprocal so x = y**(1/4) Is there a more Pythonesque way to write this?

  5. peterdb
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh. that should have been x = y**(1.0/4)

  6. velumani
    • 3 years ago
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    a longer coding way would be to "import" math module and use math.sqrt function twice, like, math.sqrt(math.sqrt(x)) !!

  7. Kyol
    • 3 years ago
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    Is there a way if you import the math module to make an n-root instead of using two square roots in a row ?

  8. velumani
    • 3 years ago
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    @Kyol: When i looked for function that could do the nth root in the math module, i found none. But, there is the power function [pow()], the same as what @peterdb has stated above (which is simple and better). Then why import math function ...??!!

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