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juciystar234

  • 3 years ago

Need help subtracting fractions (fractions below)

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  1. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350605790593:dw|

  2. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350605879888:dw|

  3. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    make them into an improper fraction first

  4. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    so like I did kinda?

  5. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    no. make them improper fractions by taking away the whole number. So the first mixed number would turn into 46/3 and the second one would turn into 19/2

  6. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    Ok hod on

  7. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350606267545:dw|

  8. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    yeah! :) Do you know how did i converted them from mixed to improper though? :o

  9. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    *convert

  10. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350606330718:dw|

  11. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes I actually did that myself I didn't see your answers til' I finished :)

  12. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    exactly! now just subtract the numerators and turn it back into a mixed number :)

  13. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350606430700:dw|

  14. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    Right?

  15. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    okay, now turn it back to a mixed number if it's asked :)

  16. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    No it's not asked. So I would leave it like that?

  17. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    6 35/6

  18. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    ummm, i guess you should turn it back into a mixed number since the problem was given to you as a mixed number

  19. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    mmm, no. the your answer for the mixed number is incorrect

  20. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    oh thanks

  21. ifunfrank
    • 3 years ago
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    your final answer would be \[5 \frac{ 5 }{ 6}\]

  22. petewe
    • 3 years ago
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    or, just ignore the fraction first, add the whole numbers then add the fractions.

  23. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    um okk........

  24. petewe
    • 3 years ago
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    converting them to improper form is unnecessary and tedious. just do (15-9) + [(1/3) - (1/2)]

  25. petewe
    • 3 years ago
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    Algebraically, you can say: let a = first constant let b = first fraction let c = second constant let d = second fraction (a-c) + (b-d)

  26. juciystar234
    • 3 years ago
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    ok but wouldn't you have to make 1/3 and 1/2 make the denominators 6

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