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AndreBarbosa

  • 3 years ago

I just don't know where to use int or float, so, when in doubt I use float. Am I right?

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  1. Chris2332
    • 3 years ago
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    int is for integer values when you know that you won't have decimal places. for example a counter for quantities that do need decimal precision (like money or distance) you should use float does that make sense?

  2. EricBerlin
    • 3 years ago
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    "When in doubt, use float" has been exactly my strategy, though I do grasp the differences between them, as described by Chris.

  3. rsmith6559
    • 3 years ago
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    You're pretty much right. Floats are basically scientific notation in binary. There are some values that they can't hit exactly. This can cause some interesting issues in comparison ( == ) statements.

  4. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    ints are standard and should be used when in doubt. They are 1, 2, 3, etc. Int ranges up to 2 million I believe. Floats also know as "Singles" as 32 bit decimal numbers 1.0, 2.4, 2.3242343242342343, etc. Double's are 64-bit floats.

  5. irfans
    • 3 years ago
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    If you are doing math operation it is good idea to use floats, but anywhere else it is better to use int.

  6. akmohamm
    • 3 years ago
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    float and int have a difference purposes. Float when you know for sure you will need it. For example lets say you have a variable you are going to use for a loop or comparision later in the program its better to use int and if needed a float value of that convert it.

  7. sdoradus
    • 3 years ago
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    Did you see lecture 2 video? Basically, BEWARE of using integers with division. With floats, 3.0 / 2.0 is 1.5. But 3/2 returns 1. As the lecturer pointed out, this is a trap for Python newbies because dividing one integer by another (like 3/2) is done with an integer result!

  8. hook
    • 3 years ago
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    Remember that with Python 3.0 this dilemma is solved since it automatically uses float when a float could occur in the results. You can still override this by using e.g. `//` for integer (instead of float) division.

  9. Dean.Shyy
    • 3 years ago
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    Int is an integer and float is a decimal. Right?

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