anonymous
  • anonymous
The following excerpt is from the Nizamu'l Mulk: On the Cortiers and Familiars of Kings (cortiers are noble people who advise or befriend royalty). Use the excerpt to answer the following question: No king can be without worthy courtiers with whom he may be at his ease and behave without restraint. For the constant society of dignitaries, of princes, and of generals, by emboldening them, detracts from the dignity and majesty of the sovereign. Speaking generally, the king should not make a familiar of anyone whom he has appointed to office, for the reason that the freedom which he enjoys on
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
I dont see a question
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh I guess not all of it showed up ): this is the rest of the information the king's carpet may lead him to practise extortion and so do harm to the king's subjects. The governor of a province should for ever stand in awe of the king, while the courtier must be ever at his ease, so that the king may derive pleasure from him and the kingly mind find relaxation through him. They should have a fixed time for one another; and it should be after the king has held audience and the great officers have all departed. —Public Domain
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is the question What can be deduced about a king's behavior as described in this excerpt? The king must follow a very precise series of rules for behavior. The king should become friendly with those he appoints to office. The king can do anything he likes. The king must stand in awe of provincial governors.

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