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zaphod

  • 3 years ago

why is k = 1/gradient? in a force/extension graph

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  1. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    @Callisto @UnkleRhaukus

  2. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    spring system?

  3. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    F=-kx ?

  4. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    yes

  5. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    i dont know what graph you mean

  6. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350829751414:dw|

  7. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350829809864:dw|

  8. Algebraic!
    • 3 years ago
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    wut.

  9. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    is this what you mean,?

  10. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1350829935387:dw|

  11. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    zaphod i need more information

  12. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    i dont understand the question

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