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lgbasallote Group Title

Rationalize: \[\huge \frac{\sqrt{4+h} - 2}h\]

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Jonask Group Title
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    \[\frac{ 4+h-4 }{ h(\sqrt{4+h}+2) }=\frac{ 1 }{\sqrt{4+h}+2 }\] nomarlly limit question

    • one year ago
  2. Jonask Group Title
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    we multiplied by\[\sqrt{4+h}+2\] both num and denominator

    • one year ago
  3. lgbasallote Group Title
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    hmmm...isn't the point of rationalization to remove radicals from the denominator?

    • one year ago
  4. swissgirl Group Title
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    Well then there were no radicals in the denominator

    • one year ago
  5. swissgirl Group Title
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    So u wld keep it the way it is

    • one year ago
  6. lgbasallote Group Title
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    really?

    • one year ago
  7. Jonask Group Title
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    imagine if this question was\[\lim_{h \rightarrow 0}\frac{ \sqrt{4+h}-2 }{ h }\]

    • one year ago
  8. lgbasallote Group Title
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    ??

    • one year ago
  9. Jonask Group Title
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    you cant just plug h=0 here but in the rationalised one

    • one year ago
  10. swissgirl Group Title
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    Ohh that is cool :P

    • one year ago
  11. lgbasallote Group Title
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    limits in an algebra question? that's morbid.....

    • one year ago
  12. ParthKohli Group Title
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    Rationalizing means to remove the radical from the place it is in...

    • one year ago
  13. swissgirl Group Title
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    hmmm well u can be asked to rationalize the numerator too

    • one year ago
  14. lgbasallote Group Title
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    now im confused with the contradictions...

    • one year ago
  15. swissgirl Group Title
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    What are the contradictions?

    • one year ago
  16. lgbasallote Group Title
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    @swissgirl said don't change...now she says change

    • one year ago
  17. swissgirl Group Title
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    Just use ur own brain -_-

    • one year ago
  18. swissgirl Group Title
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    lol

    • one year ago
  19. lgbasallote Group Title
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    someone's wrong here....wonder who

    • one year ago
  20. ParthKohli Group Title
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    If they ask you to rationalize the fraction, you do these: 1) If the radical is in the denominator — remove it from the denominator. Do not care about the numerator. 2) If the radical is in the numerator — remove it from the numerator. Do not care about the denominator.

    • one year ago
  21. Jonask Group Title
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    \[\frac{ 1 }{ \sqrt{2} }=\frac{ \sqrt{2} }{ 2 }\]

    • one year ago
  22. Jonask Group Title
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    rationalised

    • one year ago
  23. lgbasallote Group Title
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    i know what happens if it's in the denominator

    • one year ago
  24. swissgirl Group Title
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    trust me lgba knows how to rationalize a numerator or denomanator

    • one year ago
  25. lgbasallote Group Title
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    the question is if it's in the numerator

    • one year ago
  26. ParthKohli Group Title
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    See how you can't remove the radical from both numerator and denominator?

    • one year ago
  27. ParthKohli Group Title
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    Yes, so move it to the denominator. Do not care about the denominator.

    • one year ago
  28. lgbasallote Group Title
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    my question is not how to rationalize @swissgirl but if it's suppose to be rationalized

    • one year ago
  29. ParthKohli Group Title
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    You can rationalize it, but mathematicians always love if the radical is in the numerator.

    • one year ago
  30. lgbasallote Group Title
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    because what i know is that if it's in the numerator, then it's okay

    • one year ago
  31. ParthKohli Group Title
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    It's better to put radicals in the numerator rather than the denominator.

    • one year ago
  32. lgbasallote Group Title
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    so why put in denominator then?

    • one year ago
  33. Jonask Group Title
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    \[\frac{ \sqrt{2} }{ 2 }=\frac{ 1 }{ \sqrt{2} }\] these is also called rationalising sometimes it is convinient to write in the dinominatpr eg in the case of a limit

    • one year ago
  34. swissgirl Group Title
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    Well what i have always learnt was that rationalization=denominator but I have gone online and seen that some do rationalize the numerator too so it all depends what course you are taking and what you see in your the textbook

    • one year ago
  35. ParthKohli Group Title
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    Yup, I saw that you could rationalize the numerator too though it's rare.

    • one year ago
  36. lgbasallote Group Title
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    when i went online, all i saw were unreliable sources on rationalizing numerators

    • one year ago
  37. swissgirl Group Title
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    http://www.wtamu.edu/academic/anns/mps/math/mathlab/int_algebra/int_alg_tut41_rationalize.htm

    • one year ago
  38. ParthKohli Group Title
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    Never rationalize the numerator unless given a question to perform.

    • one year ago
  39. swissgirl Group Title
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    http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Extras/AlgebraTrigReview/Rationalizing.aspx

    • one year ago
  40. lgbasallote Group Title
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    \[\lim_{x \rightarrow 0} \sqrt x\]seems better than \[\lim_{x \rightarrow 0} \frac 1{\sqrt x}\] @Jonask

    • one year ago
  41. swissgirl Group Title
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    These are both reliable sources

    • one year ago
  42. lgbasallote Group Title
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    hmm

    • one year ago
  43. Jonask Group Title
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    how ever if you where asked to do the same function using the first prinsiple you will need to rationalise

    • one year ago
  44. lgbasallote Group Title
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    the links win. can't argue with that.

    • one year ago
  45. Jonask Group Title
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    \[\frac{ \sqrt{x+h}-\sqrt{x} }{ h }\]ration. \[\frac{ 1 }{ \sqrt{x+h}+\sqrt{x} }\]

    • one year ago
  46. lgbasallote Group Title
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    square roots in denominators really look weird...

    • one year ago
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