Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

lgbasallote

  • 3 years ago

How do you compute for the range of a function? is it just the inverse?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The domain of the original function will be the range of the inverse.

  2. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I don't think there is ALWAYS a systematic way of computing the range; as opposed to always having a systematic way of computing the domain.

  3. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and the range of the original function would be the domain of the inverse?

  4. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Right, as well as all point (x,y) in the original become (y,x) in the inverse

  5. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this is getting confusing....

  6. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what is the range without looping words?

  7. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    What do you mean, "without looping words"?

  8. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    well you're using words that loop (and make it complicated)

  9. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    domain of function is the range of the inverse and the range of the function is the domain of the inverse where (x,y) is (y,x) in inverse ^see how loop-y that is?

  10. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    do you know a simple explanation @nincompoop ?

  11. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Sorry, simply put: the range of a function is all the values of the dependent variable for which the function is defined. Eg: y = x^2 The range is all the values for which the dependent variable (y) is defined, which is all values greater than zero. You will never get an output of a negative number from this function.

  12. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so....the range *is* the domain of the inverse function?

  13. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes, the range of the original function IS the domain of it's inverse.

  14. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    please say yes or no before going into very confusing details

  15. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ahh a yes then

  16. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it was all i wanted to hear....

  17. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1350876020195:dw|See how the Domain and range simply switch. As you can see, the inverse of a function is reflected along y=x

  18. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ....and there came the complicated explanations

  19. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    just because i have a high level in smartscore doesn't mean i understand those things......i hate math, remember?

  20. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i'm not downloading it.....

  21. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you can delete

  22. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Do you lose smart score for deleting responses?

  23. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes. yes you do

  24. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    So that's how you got to 99!!

  25. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy