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SheldonEinstein Group Title

Can postulates be proved?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. tkhunny Group Title
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    Please provide the definition of "a postulate".

    • one year ago
  2. lgbasallote Group Title
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    it can...but people prefer not to....mathematicians love to do it though....they are somewhat masochistic.....

    • one year ago
  3. tkhunny Group Title
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    Here's a definition I found. Definition of Postulate Postulate is a true statement, which does not require to be proved. A little odd with the grammar, but it does answer your question.

    • one year ago
  4. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    a proposition that requires no proof, being self-evident, or that is for a specific purpose assumed true, and that is used in the proof of other propositions; axiom. @tkhunny http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/postulate

    • one year ago
  5. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    @tkhunny your statement says that " postulates does not require to be proved" but can they be proved, is my doubt ...

    • one year ago
  6. CliffSedge Group Title
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    Modern mathematician usage has 'axiom' and 'postulate' be interchangeable, but their original meanings are quite different.

    • one year ago
  7. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    How sir?

    • one year ago
  8. tkhunny Group Title
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    There is some variation, depending on which author you read. This is why I ask SheldonEinstein to provide a working definition for this discussion.

    • one year ago
  9. CliffSedge Group Title
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    Axioms cannot be proven because they are "self-evident" or "obviously true" which strict mathematicians and logicians don't like because they don't like to assume that anything is true. They don't allow things like a-priori knowledge or empirical evidence to influence their strictly formal logical sequences.

    • one year ago
  10. CliffSedge Group Title
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    A 'postulate' is something that one requests to be accepted as true without proof, so that the discussion can move along to prove something of greater consequence.

    • one year ago
  11. CliffSedge Group Title
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    Postulates are often axioms, but they can also be previously proven theorems that have already been accepted, and are being used as bases for additional proofs.

    • one year ago
  12. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    Oh OK got it now!

    • one year ago
  13. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    So : either they CAN BE proven or CAN NOT BE?

    • one year ago
  14. lgbasallote Group Title
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    heh mathematicians love proving imaginary things

    • one year ago
  15. lgbasallote Group Title
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    i think it's a psychological problem......i don't know.....

    • one year ago
  16. tkhunny Group Title
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    Definitive and final answer? Maybe. It is possible that some postulates can be "Proven", however, this is absolutely not the point of a postulate. Postulates are to be assumed so that we can observe the implications of the assumption. It would be entirely inappropriate to attempt to DISPROVE a postulate.

    • one year ago
  17. CliffSedge Group Title
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    As an example, let's say I want to prove the statement, "The base angles of an isosceles triangle are congruent." First, you have to accept the definition of what an isosceles triangle is as a postulate, and also accept the axioms of things being equal to themselves, and that of equals added to or subtracted from equals leaves their sums or differences equal, and so on. A previously proven theorem, such as certain triangles having corresponding congruent elements being congruent can be used as a postulate to further along the proof of the current statement - without having to go back and re-prove the prior theorem.

    • one year ago
  18. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    ^Nice example sir, agreed.

    • one year ago
  19. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    Thanks a lot guys, I think my doubt is clear now, Thanks @CliffSedge @tkhunny @lgbasallote

    • one year ago
  20. CliffSedge Group Title
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    @lgbasallote 's notion of 'psychological problem' raises a good point. It depends on what you mean by "prove." This gets into philosophy of epistemology, etc. which shouldn't be allowed to bog down the work of mathematics.

    • one year ago
  21. CliffSedge Group Title
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    In mathematics / logic / etc. One can "prove" *anything* as long as the postulates are accepted and the logical train of argument stays consistent and valid.

    • one year ago
  22. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    Right sir...

    • one year ago
  23. CliffSedge Group Title
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    If you want "prove" to mean that a proposition necessarily corresponds to objective reality, then you have to take into account sensory perception, fallibility, empirical bases of conjecture, reach of explanation, difficulty to vary an explanation, the process of experimental testing and peer criticism. . . .

    • one year ago
  24. CliffSedge Group Title
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    Me, though? I'd rather just lay out the rules of the game ahead of time and just play by the rules. As long as everybody stays consistent and all the explanations still work, I'm cool with it.

    • one year ago
  25. SheldonEinstein Group Title
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    Thanks for your reply sir, I got it now!

    • one year ago
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