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zaphod

  • 2 years ago

how do i draw the lewis structure of No2 showing which all the valence electrons including bond electrons

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  1. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    @UnkleRhaukus

  2. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    Nobelium?

  3. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    nitrogen dioxide

  4. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    NO_2

  5. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    please i hve many doubts in this, will u help me?

  6. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    yes it is

  7. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    so oxygen has 6 electrons, and nitrogen has 5, a full electron shell will be eight electrons

  8. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    yes totally 17 electrons involved

  9. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1350907215411:dw|

  10. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 2 years ago
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    As there is an odd number of electrons, there will be a lone electron on the nitrogen atom. You have to place the other 16 electrons in a more traditional

  11. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 2 years ago
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    *distribution

  12. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    how do we decide all these, we just cnt place the electrons anywhere right///

  13. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    electrons like to pair,

  14. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1350907464012:dw|

  15. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1350907518373:dw| the arrow does it represent a coordinate bond?

  16. UnkleRhaukus
    • 2 years ago
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    your oxgen (on the right side) want some more electrons, i dont know about the arrow

  17. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    yeah the lone pair, u have no idea about dative covaelnt bonding?

  18. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1350907863904:dw|

  19. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 2 years ago
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    Dative covalent bonds appear when you form compounds from other molecules such as:|dw:1350908177659:dw| Both electrons of the new bond belonged to the N atom before the bond was made. In a normal covalent bond, each atom provides 1 electron.

  20. zaphod
    • 2 years ago
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    in nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen is giving 2 electrons to oxygen, so then that is a coordinate bond..i am just confused..

  21. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 2 years ago
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    I don't think so. I would write:|dw:1350908582427:dw| Here, all bonds are formed with 2 electrons from different atoms.

  22. Preetha
    • 2 years ago
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    You can only make one double bond and one single bond around the N, not two double bonds. You cannot have 9 electrons around N as shown above. You can have less than 8, not more than 8. This is a paramagnetic molecule, with an unpaired electron. http://www.kentchemistry.com/links/bonding/LewisDotTutorials/NO2.htm

  23. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 2 years ago
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    Thanks Preetha for this very interesting contribution :))

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