anonymous
  • anonymous
Is there is a branch called 'criminal psychology,' how do psychologist study criminals?
HippoCampus Psychology
katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
There is. I study it, through books. Criminal behavior can be patterned. There are many kinds of criminals, from high CEOs who embezzle from their employees, to more..."small time" criminals, who shoplift. But they both have the same mindset. In psychology, we study criminals based on how they think, rather than just the act of committing a crime. Someone who commits a crime is not necessarily a true criminal. Psychologists think of a true criminal as someone who thinks, and sees the world, in a certain way. For example, going past the speed limit, on any road, is a crime. But think about how many people speed. Does that mean that they have the same criminal mindset as someone who tortures and kills prostitutes? Of course not. I know you like to ask for book recommendations. I read "The Anatomy of Evil," by Dr. Michael H. Stone. He's a psychiatrist who studies criminals. It's a good informational book, with lots of case examples. Many psychologists study criminals by looking at their crimes, looking at their interviews with police, and speaking with them, in person. Many true criminals are proud of themselves and their crimes. They'll talk about them. The ones in jail are only sorry that they got caught.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Have you done any case studies with a criminal or mysterious guy in your real life?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Nope, I haven't. Because I've never known anyone with whom I've met to be a true criminal. Dr. Robert Hare, a forensic psychologist, estimates that about 1% of the general population is psychopathic. We can safely assume that all psychopaths are true criminals, and have a genuine criminal mindset, whether or not they are actually caught committing a crime. 1% of the general population means that 1 person out of every 100 people is a psychopath. And given the number of people who I've met, in my life, it's likely that I have met a psychopath before, unaware that they are a psychopath.

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