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lgbasallote Group Title

Fuel mileage is uniformly distributed between 5 km/L to 12 km/L. What is the probability that on the next trip, fuel mileage is between 6 to 9 km/L

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. amistre64 Group Title
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    12-5 = 7 |dw:1350993412929:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  2. lgbasallote Group Title
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    ahh finally...someone who understands

    • 2 years ago
  3. amistre64 Group Title
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    iwould take a gander and say\[\frac{1}{7}{(9-6)}\]

    • 2 years ago
  4. lgbasallote Group Title
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    what's that 1/7 by the way?

    • 2 years ago
  5. lgbasallote Group Title
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    |dw:1350993820431:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  6. amistre64 Group Title
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    a distribution curve has an area of 1 underneath it. since this is a uniform distribution. the "curve" is just a rectangle box with an area of 1 since the width is 7 units wide; the height of the box would have to be 1/7 to get an area of 1

    • 2 years ago
  7. lgbasallote Group Title
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    hmm...that's an intuitive way of solving it....and here i thought i have to do \[\huge \int \limits_a^b f(x)dx\]

    • 2 years ago
  8. amistre64 Group Title
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    when it gets to normal distributions with a bell curve; they were nice enough to write down tables of for the integration :)

    • 2 years ago
  9. lgbasallote Group Title
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    ^?

    • 2 years ago
  10. amistre64 Group Title
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    a z table is a table of probabilities; it is written up for the same reason that sin and cos tables are written up. So that we dont have to suffer thru the integration of some ungodly looking integral

    • 2 years ago
  11. lgbasallote Group Title
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    ...you have succeeded in confusing and scaring me at the same time....

    • 2 years ago
  12. amistre64 Group Title
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    yay!! happy halloween :)

    • 2 years ago
  13. lgbasallote Group Title
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    it's already christmas from where i am

    • 2 years ago
  14. amistre64 Group Title
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    hmmm, happy hanakah? ;)

    • 2 years ago
  15. lgbasallote Group Title
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    anyway...this would just be \[\int \limits_a^b \frac 1{b-a} dx\] yes?

    • 2 years ago
  16. lgbasallote Group Title
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    wait...that's wrong

    • 2 years ago
  17. lgbasallote Group Title
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    \[\int \limits_a^x \frac 1{b-a}dx\] yes?

    • 2 years ago
  18. amistre64 Group Title
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    if you wanted to do the \[\int f(x)dx\]then a uniform distribution is a constant function \[\int_{5}^{12}k~dx=1\] \[12k-5k=1\] \[7k=1\] \[k=\frac17\] therefore \[\int_{6}^{9}\frac17~dx\]

    • 2 years ago
  19. lgbasallote Group Title
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    so...i am right...yes?

    • 2 years ago
  20. amistre64 Group Title
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    1/(b-a) does generalize it yes. but the interval [a,x] seems a little off. that should simply be the interval across which you are integrating and should prolly not be confused with the other parts

    • 2 years ago
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