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ihavemathquestions

  • 3 years ago

gagasgesfdz

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  1. ihavemathquestions
    • 3 years ago
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    @satellite73

  2. Help1234321
    • 3 years ago
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    I don't understand what you are asking?

  3. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    suppose you have a specific system to solve, like \[2x+3y=13\] and \[x-6y=-1\] then you can rewrite the first equation \[2x+3y=13\] as an "equivalent" equation \[4x+6y=26\]

  4. ihavemathquestions
    • 3 years ago
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    thank you @satellite73 as usual you are amazing. you are so awesome. i love you

  5. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    the purpose for doing that, is that now you have the same "coefficient' for the \(y\) term, which means when you add the two equations \[4x+6y=26\]\[x-6y=-1\] you get \[5x=25\]so rewriting either one or both of the equations as and equivalent equation allows you to arrange it so that one variable will add up to zero (cancel)

  6. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    yw (blush)

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