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lilisa27

  • 2 years ago

Integrate e^(2x) on the interval [-1, 1]

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  1. ByteMe
    • 2 years ago
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    let u=2x so du=2dx or \(\large \frac{1}{2}du=dx \) so, \(\large \int_{-1}^{1}e^{2x}dx=\int_{-2}^{2}e^udu=e^u|_{-2}^{2}= \) ???

  2. ByteMe
    • 2 years ago
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    oops... there should be a factor of 1/2 outside of that second integral.....

  3. lilisa27
    • 2 years ago
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    So the limits do change..... was curious about that.... So it should be.... 27.2899172?

  4. ByteMe
    • 2 years ago
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    this is what it should look like: \(\large \int_{-1}^{1}e^{2x}dx=\frac{1}{2}\int_{-2}^{2}e^udu=\frac{1}{2}e^u|_{-2}^{2}=\frac{1}{2}(e^2-e^{-2})=\frac{1}{2}(\frac{e^4-1}{e^2})=\frac{e^4-1}{2e^2} \) that's the exact form.

  5. lilisa27
    • 2 years ago
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    ..... isn't u standing in for "2x".... therefore it would be e^4 - e^(-4)?

  6. ByteMe
    • 2 years ago
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    yes it is but we made a u-substitution that enables us to evaluate the integral in terms of u so we use -2 and 2 as the lower/upper limits of integration

  7. ByteMe
    • 2 years ago
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    if you wanted to back substitute so you could use x , then the limits would not change.

  8. lilisa27
    • 2 years ago
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    ....Pretty sure in class, even when making u substitutions, we always would convert back to x form after integrating, keeping the new limits of the integral, and substituting those numbers in for x....

  9. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    Fun fact: did you know you can actually perform definite integrals in scientific calculators?

  10. swissgirl
    • 2 years ago
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    Yes someone like a half a yr ago informed me. Just cant remember who

  11. lilisa27
    • 2 years ago
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    Uh, yeah.... but when I do it by hand I'm not getting the right answer. And I have to show my work as though I did it by hand.

  12. ByteMe
    • 2 years ago
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    Since this is a definite integral, the answer is numeric. so i don't see why you would back substitute back to x if we already made the transition from x to u. But either way, the numeric answer should be the same if you did a back subsitution to x or used the new limits involving u.

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