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sara1234

  • 3 years ago

Help please ?

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  1. soty2013
    • 3 years ago
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    sure

  2. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    you are looking for the number between 0 and \(\pi\) whose cosine is \(\frac{1}{2}\)

  3. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    if you still have that cheat sheet, look at the place on the upper half of the unit circle where the second coordinate is \(\frac{1}{2}\)

  4. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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  5. Aperogalics
    • 3 years ago
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    π/3 simple

  6. Aperogalics
    • 3 years ago
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    :)

  7. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    ok here is the picture |dw:1351127015253:dw|

  8. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    in this picture, \(\theta=\arctan(2)\) an angle whose tangent is 2 since tangent is "opposite over adjacent" i labelled the opposite side 2 and the adjacent side 1

  9. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    the hypotenuse we find by pythagoras, it is \(\sqrt{1^2+2^2}=\sqrt{1+4}=\sqrt{5}\)

  10. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    and using sine as "opposite over hypotenuse" we see that the sine of the angle is \[\frac{2}{\sqrt{5}}\]

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