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lgbasallote

  • 3 years ago

LGBARIDDLE Let P(m,n) be the statement "m divides n" where the universe of discourse for both variables is the set of positive integers. Which of the following propositions is FALSE? (a) P(2, 4) (b) \(\exists m \forall n\)P(m,n) (c) \(\forall m \forall n\) P(m,n) (d) \(\forall n\) P(1,n) (e) None of the above

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  1. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    I don't like saying that one divides anything, so I'm going with (e)

  2. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    why not a b c?

  3. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh, woops, you wanted the FALSE one.... (reading fail)

  4. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    I think (a) is the only true one, actually.

  5. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    why so?

  6. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Like I said, I don't like saying that one divides anything.

  7. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Personal preference, I guess.

  8. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    If I drop that preference, then I suppose (c) is false.

  9. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    hmm is that so..

  10. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    As I understand it. I could be wrong. I don't usually deal with this sort of stuff.

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