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HorseCrazyGirlForever

  • 3 years ago

How do I add fractions?

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  1. Esteven
    • 3 years ago
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    Are the denominators the same?

  2. HorseCrazyGirlForever
    • 3 years ago
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    No.

  3. Eulie
    • 3 years ago
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    www.webmath.com/addfract.html

  4. Eulie
    • 3 years ago
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    www.youtube.com/watch?v=lavgnJAkfKM

  5. Eulie
    • 3 years ago
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    those might help

  6. HorseCrazyGirlForever
    • 3 years ago
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    I don't like to watch videos because I never learn from them... :(

  7. Eulie
    • 3 years ago
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    oh sorry then

  8. Zarkon
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\frac{a}{b}+\frac{c}{d}=\frac{a\times d+c\times b}{b\times d}\]

  9. SheldonEinstein
    • 3 years ago
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    What @Zarkon did , is said to be use of LCM ..

  10. screamincat
    • 3 years ago
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    If the denominator is not the same then you will have to find the most common one. then add the top numbers and keep the denominator same. Been awhile sence i done then.

  11. ethompsonn
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1351266657384:dw|

  12. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    \[{\heartsuit \over \spadesuit}+{\diamondsuit \over \clubsuit} = {\heartsuit\clubsuit + \diamondsuit \spadesuit \over \spadesuit \clubsuit}\]

  13. SheldonEinstein
    • 3 years ago
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    LCM ---> Least common multiple just like I want to give you an example of LCM in addition of fractions : \[\large{\frac{3}{4} + \frac{4}{5} = ?}\] Now, to add these fractions , we need to take LCM of the denominators of both of the fractions... i.e. of 4 and 5 Multiples of 4 = 4,8,12,16,20,32,36,40 .... Multiples of 5 = 5,10,15,20,25,30,35,40... Common multiples = 20, 40 , ... Least common multiple = 20 So from this we get LCM of 4 and 5 is 20 Now divide 20 by 4 , you get 5, multiply 5 by the numerator of the first fraction i.e. 5 * 3 = 15 .Similarly for second fraction, divide 20 by 5, you get 4, multiply 4 by 4 = 16 \[\large{\frac{5*3 + 4*4}{20} = \frac{15+16}{20} = \frac{31}{20} }\]

  14. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Although, you can straightforwardly add the numerators if the denominators are same.

  15. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Why we use LCM is to get to a point where we can straightforwardly add the numerators.

  16. HorseCrazyGirlForever
    • 3 years ago
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    SO what would 4/3 + 7/6 =

  17. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    Get a common denominator.

  18. SheldonEinstein
    • 3 years ago
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    Instead of LCM you can also do "common denominators" : \[\large{\frac{4}{3} + \frac{7}{6} = ? }\] Let us take 4/3 first : multiply denominators and numerators by 2 \[\large{\frac{4\times 2}{3\times 2} = \frac{8}{6}}\] So, we can also write 4/3 as : 8/6 Now let us take L: 7/6 See we have to get common denominators in both the fractions. we have one fraction as 8/6 and another one is 7/6 Their denominators are same i.e. 6 so we can just add numerators "now" : \[\large{\frac{8}{6} + \frac{7}{6} = \frac{8+7}{6} = \frac{15}{6}}\]

  19. SheldonEinstein
    • 3 years ago
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    Note: Don't add denominators, only numerators are to be added.

  20. SheldonEinstein
    • 3 years ago
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    @HorseCrazyGirlForever I hope you got it now, any confusion you have now?

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