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AGummiBear55

  • 3 years ago

If every 24 seconds someone gets in a car crash, how many crashes will happen in 1 minute?

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  1. isellsani
    • 3 years ago
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    60/24 = 2.5 car crashes in one minute

  2. etemplin
    • 3 years ago
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    60 seconds in 1 minute, how many 24 second time intervals fit into one minute? 2.5 crashes each minute

  3. AGummiBear55
    • 3 years ago
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    Thank you guys! :) <3

  4. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    How do you determine a half crash?

  5. etemplin
    • 3 years ago
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    @hero, sometimes these stats represent averages. that means one minute there might be 2, but one minute there might be 3. The average is 2.5

  6. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    That didn't exactly answer the question, "How do you determine half a crash?", but okay.

  7. tkhunny
    • 3 years ago
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    This is the danger in stating statistics VERY BADLY, such as this problem statement. It obviously leads to ludicrous results. There is no such thing a ½ a crash. I shake my head almost daily when wuch things are reported. "Every 3 minutes, _______ is diagnosed." Hogwash. "Every 4 hours, __________ is suffered by someone." Utter hogwash. It should read something like this, "Over a very long period of observation, it was observed that the average time between car crashes was about 24 seconds." It's a random distribution, not a fixed point in space and time. Okay, that's enough raving for now...

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