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charlotteakina

  • 3 years ago

9. Does f(x)=2.5 represent an exponential growth or decay equation? How do you know?

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  1. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    that is not a function at all.

  2. piscez.in
    • 3 years ago
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    @LollyLau it is a function

  3. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    O RLY?

  4. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    anything with f(x)? well erm it IS but it is of no use at all :S

  5. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    horizontal graph lol

  6. piscez.in
    • 3 years ago
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    @charlotteakina yes you are

  7. piscez.in
    • 3 years ago
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    @LollyLau yes looks like a horzontal line and it is definitely a function

  8. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    ok.

  9. piscez.in
    • 3 years ago
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    a DC current will look like this function with x representing time

  10. piscez.in
    • 3 years ago
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    @LollyLau

  11. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    dc current ain't relevant lol

  12. Fall12-13
    • 3 years ago
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    F(x) = 2.5 It is not a function, because any function will have an 'x' with some coefficient. This is just a value. Also, the formula either for exponential or decay function isn't relevant to this one, so I don't think it is either a decay or an exponential function.

  13. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    @piscez.in

  14. Fall12-13
    • 3 years ago
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    Adding to my previous post, F(x) = 2.5 is NOT a function because it's not in the form F(x) = 2.5x^2 or 2.5x or something. Ideally, a function is the one where you can select an input value and see the same for the output. For F(x) = 2.5 Whatever value x might have, the output is still 2.5 So, it's not a function, but rather, a constant value.

  15. piscez.in
    • 3 years ago
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    @ lollylau, yes, DC is a special case of a function, I know it because i studied all this in college. @Fall12-13 f(x) is a function with a constant value for all x. @charlotteakina No hun, its not an exponential or decaying function. Exponetial function= a^x Exponetially decaying functions= a^ (-x)

  16. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    aw :(

  17. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    college so what ? :(

  18. LollyLau
    • 3 years ago
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    bye

  19. Fall12-13
    • 3 years ago
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    @piscez.in Thanks for the rectification. But in either case, it still neither an exponential or decay function.

  20. piscez.in
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1351522380792:dw|

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