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lilsis76

  • 3 years ago

just a question. how can i find cos5pi/2 ? where is that on the unit circle?

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  1. Kyleia
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1351751989230:dw|

  2. lilsis76
    • 3 years ago
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    so i kep going around?

  3. ByteMe
    • 3 years ago
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    5pi/2 is coterminal with pi/2

  4. lilsis76
    • 3 years ago
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    what is coterminal?

  5. ByteMe
    • 3 years ago
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    an angle has a initial side (positive x-axis), and a terminal side... it means that their terminal sides are the same.

  6. ByteMe
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1351738068822:dw|

  7. lilsis76
    • 3 years ago
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    oh...okay, so then pi/3 would be 15pi/3?

  8. ByteMe
    • 3 years ago
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    no... they have to differ by MULTIPLES of 2pi... notice that 5pi/2 = 2pi + pi/2 but 15pi/3 = 5pi, not a multiple of 2pi.

  9. lilsis76
    • 3 years ago
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    hmmmm...................... :( im getting badder at this. ugh. okay ill post a new question cuz this one i superly need help on

  10. ByteMe
    • 3 years ago
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    think of it this way.... they differ by 2pi because 2pi is just a full rotation... so think of 30 degrees... 30 degrees is coterminal with 390 degrees because all you're doing is adding a full rotation 360 degrees: 30 + 360 = 390

  11. lilsis76
    • 3 years ago
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    okay, i think i see it

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