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math_proof

  • 3 years ago

double integral in polar coordinates problem

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  1. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\int\limits_{}^{}\int\limits_{}^{} (x^2+y^2)\]

  2. myko
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\int\limits\int\limits r^2 rdrd \theta\]

  3. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    R=\[0\le R \le, 0 \le \Theta \le 2\pi\]

  4. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    how did you get that?

  5. myko
    • 3 years ago
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    x=rcos(theta) y=rsin(theta) the other r multiplying r^2 is the Jacobian of the coordinate transfomation matrix

  6. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    hate those polar coordinates

  7. myko
    • 3 years ago
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    :), they are preaty usefull

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