Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
Which of the following statements is true about solar eclipses? Solar eclipses last as long as lunar eclipses. Solar eclipses are caused by the earth's shadow Solar eclipses do not last as long as lunar eclipses Solar eclipses can be seen from every location on earth at the same time
Physics
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
@Preetha
Preetha
  • Preetha
Gabby I am not completely sure. Sorry.
Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
ohh ok its ok :)

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Preetha
  • Preetha
Here is the wikipedia page: As seen from the Earth, a solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Sun and Earth, and the Moon fully or partially blocks the Sun. This can happen only at new moon, when the Sun and the Moon are in conjunction as seen from Earth. In a total eclipse, the disk of the Sun is fully obscured by the Moon. In partial and annular eclipses only part of the Sun is obscured.
Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
What do you think it is?
Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
I know its NOT A or D
Preetha
  • Preetha
So it looks like it is not caused by the earth, but by the moon's shadow. It lasts a few minutes and so 1 and 2 are false. I think they do not last as long as lunar, so I am thinking this is correct.
Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
so its C?
Preetha
  • Preetha
Yes. I checked and it is not D. You can only see a solar eclipse in a narrow region of the world.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yep it's C. Solar eclipses last for ten's of seconds whereas lunar eclipses last all night.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Gabylovesyou a total solar eclipse takes on the order of a couple of hours from start to finish, with totality (the part where the sun is completely blocked out) on the order of a couple of minutes. while The totality phase of a total lunar eclipse can last anywhere from a few minutes to a couple of hours depending on the exact geometry of the eclipse. so no answer is correct:)
Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
but i have to have an answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
just compare the dats i take from net total lunar eclipse (as of this writing) on 21 Dec 2010 will last 5 hours 35 minutes 7 seconds; of that time, 3 hours 28 minutes 41 seconds will be an umbral eclipse (part of the moon actually goes dark red instead of just dimming slightly) and the entire moon will be in the umbral region (totality, dark red all over) for 1 hour 12 minutes 21 seconds
anonymous
  • anonymous
the time changes it all depends upon the geometrical position of three
anonymous
  • anonymous
I mean you can see the fully eclipsed sun for a few seconds from any one place on the earth. But you an see a lunar eclipse all night, from 1 place.
Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
is it still C/
anonymous
  • anonymous
Absolutely. Have no doubt.
Gabylovesyou
  • Gabylovesyou
k :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
It varies depending on several factors: whether it is a partial or total eclipse, how close the moon is to the earth in its elliptical orbit (this affects the apparent size and speed of the moon), how close the earth is to the sun in its orbit (this affects the apparent size of the sun), etc. In general, though, a total eclipse takes on the order of a couple of hours from start to finish, with totality (the part where the sun is completely blocked out) on the order of a couple of minutes. It's actually pretty easy to estimate the first number - all you have to know is the apparent angular size of the sun and moon in the sky (about half a degree each) and the the time it takes the moon to orbit the earth (about one month)

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