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LyraElizabethAdams

PLEASE HELP!!!! Please explain why this is FALSE: "5. Using data from Boston, Massachusetts, a test of independence is run on the claim that ice cream sales per month and the number of car wrecks per month are independent. The claim is rejected. Using number of car wrecks as the x variable and ice cream sales as the y variable, an r value of r=0.923 is then computed and shown to exceed the critical value for this data. The data is double checked and verified. This shows that car wrecks cause ice cream sales."

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. jim_thompson5910
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    That r value is the key here

    • one year ago
  2. jim_thompson5910
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    usually when it's this high (regardless of the critical value), it implies there's a strong correlation between the two variables

    • one year ago
  3. LyraElizabethAdams
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    Okay

    • one year ago
  4. LyraElizabethAdams
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    Oh, yes - I do remember learning that.

    • one year ago
  5. jim_thompson5910
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    a strong correlation corresponds to the two variables being linked (one is independent and the other is dependent on that independent variable)

    • one year ago
  6. LyraElizabethAdams
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    Makes sense, so far.

    • one year ago
  7. jim_thompson5910
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    so they can't be independent if they are linked like this

    • one year ago
  8. jim_thompson5910
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    that's why the claim that they are independent is rejected

    • one year ago
  9. LyraElizabethAdams
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    Oh, I think I see what you're meaning - because the correlation (relationship) between "x" and "y" is so strong, both variables are dependent on each other, so it is not possible that they could be independent of each other?

    • one year ago
  10. jim_thompson5910
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    that is close, it's more like "one variable dictates what the other variable is...so one variable is independent while the other depends on the first variable"

    • one year ago
  11. LyraElizabethAdams
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    Okay

    • one year ago
  12. jim_thompson5910
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    but yes, they are linked in a way that they can't be independent of each other

    • one year ago
  13. LyraElizabethAdams
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    So, if the problem IS correct to have rejected the claim, what part of the problem is incorrect?

    • one year ago
  14. jim_thompson5910
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    I'm not sure what you mean

    • one year ago
  15. jim_thompson5910
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    oh i know what you're asking

    • one year ago
  16. LyraElizabethAdams
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    Well, the instructions for the problem say it is false. I'm supposed to explain why it's false.

    • one year ago
  17. jim_thompson5910
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    this is a very dangerous part of statistics because students often confuse correlation and causation

    • one year ago
  18. jim_thompson5910
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    this is very important not to mix the two

    • one year ago
  19. jim_thompson5910
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    if two variables are strongly correlated with each other, it doesn't necessarily mean that one causes the other

    • one year ago
  20. LyraElizabethAdams
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    I should probably let you know that the last part of the problem says: NOTE: While this specific r-value is made up, this general pattern has been shown in several real world data sets involving ice cream sales and number of car wrecks in major cities on the east coast of the United States.

    • one year ago
  21. jim_thompson5910
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    ie correlation does NOT imply causation

    • one year ago
  22. LyraElizabethAdams
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    I'm not sure if the NOTE is true or false (I don't know if my professor is saying that this part is false or true.

    • one year ago
  23. jim_thompson5910
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    just because they both tend to decrease (for instance), doesn't mean that one causes the other to decrease as it decreases

    • one year ago
  24. jim_thompson5910
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    does that make sense?

    • one year ago
  25. LyraElizabethAdams
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    Yes! Thank you so much! I really appreciate that you took your time to help me! :) I understand it.

    • one year ago
  26. jim_thompson5910
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    you're welcome

    • one year ago
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