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sasogeek Group Title

11. Airborn travel and tours arrange trips and have a fixed cost of $1,000 per week. Their variable cost per trip can be represented by the function VC = X – 20 where X is the number of trips arranged. The price of a trip is $50. What is the break-even number of trips per week for this company?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. sasogeek Group Title
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    the variable cost turns out to be a function of number of trips which varies per week, obviously... how do i determine the value of X and hence, solve the problem?

    • 2 years ago
  2. sasogeek Group Title
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    break even = fixed cost / (selling price - variable cost) break even = 1000 / (50-x+20) break even = 1000/70-x hence depending on the number of trips they have, they're break even point will either increase or decrease.

    • 2 years ago
  3. sasogeek Group Title
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    @hartnn

    • 2 years ago
  4. sasogeek Group Title
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    what do you think? can i leave my answer in terms of x or there's a value for x i'm not seeing? OR i could assume a value for x?

    • 2 years ago
  5. hartnn Group Title
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    i have not seen such question before, you have used all the given information , so i think the answer will be in terms of X, is this calculus, in any way ??

    • 2 years ago
  6. hartnn Group Title
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    oh, this is economics...

    • 2 years ago
  7. sasogeek Group Title
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    not calculus, but it was an assignment by our computational math lecturer... :/

    • 2 years ago
  8. sasogeek Group Title
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    linear programming i suppose...

    • 2 years ago
  9. hartnn Group Title
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    found this in wiki, 'he break-even point (BEP) is the point at which cost or expenses and revenue are equal: there is no net loss or gain, and one has "broken even.' donno whether it helps

    • 2 years ago
  10. hartnn Group Title
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    so can u find profit and loss ? then equate them, maybe u get an equation in X which you can solve

    • 2 years ago
  11. sasogeek Group Title
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    yeah i know what the break even point is, i just dunno about this question cos it says x is the number of trips a week but there's no clues as to how to determine x... unless maybe i work at that company lol :P

    • 2 years ago
  12. hartnn Group Title
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    1000+x-20= revenue = 50 = selling price so maybe u can find x from here, but i am not sure

    • 2 years ago
  13. hartnn Group Title
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    2nd opinion needed

    • 2 years ago
  14. sasogeek Group Title
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    hmmm, well finding x means x will now seize to be a variable...

    • 2 years ago
  15. hartnn Group Title
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    maybe for 1 break even point, there is one X, which we can find from the equation i wrote....

    • 2 years ago
  16. sasogeek Group Title
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    hmm, well that makes sense, so then the break even point is dependent on X... I guess I'll leave the answer in terms of X :/

    • 2 years ago
  17. hartnn Group Title
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    yeah, that was my first call, leave answer in X only....

    • 2 years ago
  18. sasogeek Group Title
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    ok thanks hartnn :) <3

    • 2 years ago
  19. hartnn Group Title
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    welcome ^_^

    • 2 years ago
  20. hartnn Group Title
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    though i didn't help much....

    • 2 years ago
  21. sasogeek Group Title
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    well you confirmed my work.. that's a lot xx

    • 2 years ago
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