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geerky42

  • 3 years ago

A trough is 12 feet long and 3 feet across the top. Its end are isolates triangles with altitudes of 3 feet. If water is being pumped into the trough at 2 cubic feet per min, how fast is the water level rising when the water is 1 foot deep?

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  1. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    @hartnn @Hero @helder_edwin @jiteshmeghwal9

  2. jiteshmeghwal9
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry @geerky42 no idea :( i'm not good in geometry

  3. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    Any idea? @rajathsbhat

  4. rajathsbhat
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, actually. But tell me, is the trough like this:|dw:1352120844035:dw|?

  5. rajathsbhat
    • 3 years ago
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    i don't get the "12 feet long" part.

  6. phi
    • 3 years ago
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    Is isolates triangles supposed to be isosceles triangles?

  7. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1352121448125:dw|

  8. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    I think this is what question means, but i honestly have no idea...

  9. rajathsbhat
    • 3 years ago
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    where are the triangles? :\

  10. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1352121575320:dw|

  11. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    triangle prism, idk.

  12. rajathsbhat
    • 3 years ago
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    yes! phi's got it right!

  13. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    So it's like trapezoid prism or what?

  14. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    @mahmit2012 @mayankdevnani

  15. rajathsbhat
    • 3 years ago
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    I think it's a triangular prism.

  16. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    An isosceles triangular prism?

  17. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    where it has base of 3ft and heigh of 3 ft?

  18. phi
    • 3 years ago
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    the only thing that makes sense is |dw:1352123776310:dw|

  19. phi
    • 3 years ago
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    The ratio of base to altitude of the triangular base is 3/3 = 1 when the water is at height h, the base (width of the water) is also h |dw:1352123882327:dw| the area as a function of h is 1/2 h^2 volume is 12 * 1/2 *h^2

  20. phi
    • 3 years ago
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    \[ v= 6 h^2\] \[\frac{dv}{dt}= 12 h \frac{dh}{dt} \] plug in for h and dh/dt to find dv/dt

  21. geerky42
    • 3 years ago
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    I see, thanks!

  22. phi
    • 3 years ago
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    I still don't know what Its end are isolates triangles means....

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