Ace school

with brainly

  • Get help from millions of students
  • Learn from experts with step-by-step explanations
  • Level-up by helping others

A community for students.

A 14 foot ladder is leaning against a wall. If the top slips down the wall at a rate of 4ft/s, how fast will the foot be moving away from the wall when the top is 11 feet from the ground.

Calculus1
See more answers at brainly.com
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Join Brainly to access

this expert answer

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

To see the expert answer you'll need to create a free account at Brainly

|dw:1352140346872:dw|
So our first step is to find x. The length of that side. I think we'll end up needing that :o Remember your Pythagorean Theorem for finding that side? :)
Ya so x would then be 11 as well because 14^2-11^2=121 and the square root of that is 11

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question

Other answers:

k cool :D
wow lol my bad i mean it's the square root of 75 is x not 11 so like 8.66 is x :) miscalculated
Oh heh :3
Sorry about that :)
So we'll call it ... 5sqrt3 i guess :D in simplified form.
sounds good
Hmm I'm trying to remember how to do this type of problem XD Lol. I think we can do it like this. \[\large x^2 + y^2 = 14^2\] Taking the derivative from this point. (With respect to t, time).
so the derivative of x^2+y^2=14^2 is -x/y?
\[\large 2x\frac{ dx }{ dt }+2y \frac{ dy }{ dt }=0\] Since our derivative is with respect to t, Every time we differentiate a variable that is NOT t, we have to apply the chain rule multiplying by the d/dt term. For example when we differentiate x^2, we get 2x, but a dx/dt will pop out also.
yes yes I remember my teacher saying that!
so we plug in the dy/dt which is -4 and solve for dx/dt?
Heh :3 Ok cool. So now if we look at our problem. We now have 4 variables! Eeek! But we already KNOW 3 of them from the earlier! Yes plug in dy/dt, and also plug in y and x that we set up earlier :)
from the earlier? what is wrong with me -_- ugh..
lol its fine :)
so it's 2(5sqrt3)(dx/dt)+2(11)(-4) is this right?
Hmm yes good good :) equals 0
yes of course lol :)
so my answer is 5.08?
yes it's right!!1 THANK YOU SOOOO MUCH!! :)
Yay team \c:/
I have another question going it's a problem solving like this but in the mathematics section do you think you can help me with that one too please?
When you do these problems, one way to check your work is this... You should get an answer that MAKES SENSE. If the ladder is sliding down the wall in the y direction at 4 ft/s Then our slide along the x direction should be a similar number.
the gravel problem?
true true, and yes the gravel problem lol :)

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question