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krypton

  • 3 years ago

pls help am doing a problem on integration,area between curves y1=x^3, and y2=x which one shouldd be on top?

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  1. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    which one should be the top boundary?

  2. malical
    • 3 years ago
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    I just graphed them and it appears to be that f(x)=x is on top of f(x)=x^3 from obviously 0 to whenever x^3=x. (1)

  3. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    oh thanks,and so my points of intersection are 1 and -1?

  4. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    Don't forget 0

  5. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    how will i use 0 now?

  6. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    which boundary should i take 1,0,-1?

  7. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    Just keep in mind that they intersect at 0.

  8. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    What else does the question/problem say?

  9. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    calculate the area bounded by those curves with respect to x axis

  10. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\int\limits_{-1}^{1}?\]

  11. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    will that be my boundary?

  12. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    If you go from -1 to 1, it's just going to be twice as much as whatever the area from 0 to 1 is.

  13. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    so can i do it that way,which points do i need to pick?

  14. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    problem should have specified a bit more information... but I'd just do 0 to 1.

  15. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    Since even if you did do from -1 to 1, you'd have to split up the integral because at some point they switch positions.

  16. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    a bit confuse.dont know the boundary to pick now

  17. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    anyways i can use 1 and 0 right?

  18. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    yeah just do that.

  19. krypton
    • 3 years ago
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    okay thanks

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