Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

krypton

  • 2 years ago

pls help am doing a problem on integration,area between curves y1=x^3, and y2=x which one shouldd be on top?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    which one should be the top boundary?

  2. malical
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I just graphed them and it appears to be that f(x)=x is on top of f(x)=x^3 from obviously 0 to whenever x^3=x. (1)

  3. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh thanks,and so my points of intersection are 1 and -1?

  4. wio
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Don't forget 0

  5. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    how will i use 0 now?

  6. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    which boundary should i take 1,0,-1?

  7. wio
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Just keep in mind that they intersect at 0.

  8. wio
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What else does the question/problem say?

  9. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    calculate the area bounded by those curves with respect to x axis

  10. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\int\limits_{-1}^{1}?\]

  11. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    will that be my boundary?

  12. wio
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If you go from -1 to 1, it's just going to be twice as much as whatever the area from 0 to 1 is.

  13. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so can i do it that way,which points do i need to pick?

  14. wio
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    problem should have specified a bit more information... but I'd just do 0 to 1.

  15. wio
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Since even if you did do from -1 to 1, you'd have to split up the integral because at some point they switch positions.

  16. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a bit confuse.dont know the boundary to pick now

  17. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    anyways i can use 1 and 0 right?

  18. wio
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah just do that.

  19. krypton
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay thanks

  20. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.