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math_proof

  • 3 years ago

what does f mean with arrow on top of it?

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  1. etemplin
    • 3 years ago
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    likely its a vector, but it could be other things

  2. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    no it has to do with math proofs

  3. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    is it like inverse function or what?

  4. etemplin
    • 3 years ago
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    with an arrow?? hmmm....usually an inverse has a -1 as its exponent...what kind of proofs (what subject/level of math) are you doing?

  5. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    functions

  6. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    injections, surjections etc

  7. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    and there is an arrow to the left and arrow to the right above letter f

  8. etemplin
    • 3 years ago
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bijection,_injection_and_surjection http://www.math.fsu.edu/~pkirby/mad2104/SlideShow/s4_2.pdf i dont know what the notation means, but the above links may be able to help

  9. math_proof
    • 3 years ago
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    is it image of X or something?

  10. etemplin
    • 3 years ago
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    i have no idea what the notation means. but those links should be able to help. heress some more http://www.cs.uwyo.edu/~jlc/courses/2300/hw/hw19d.pdf http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=345400

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