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burhan101

  • 3 years ago

Long divide

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  1. burhan101
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1352343487773:dw|

  2. burhan101
    • 3 years ago
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    vertical asymptote

  3. burhan101
    • 3 years ago
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    how do I long divide this to find the vertical asymptote of the function and the range ?

  4. seitys
    • 3 years ago
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    Remember that you can divide in parts so that (3x-1)/x is the same as (3x/x) - (1/x). The 3x/x can be simplified to 3. When you graph this function, it is just 1/x shifted up 3 spaces. For example if x = 1, y = 3 + 1/1 = 4. As for the asymptote, it is at x = 0 because 1/x is not defined when x = 0.

  5. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    (long division is for horizontal or slant asymptotes, not vertical asymptotes, but yeah, that's a way to do it.)

  6. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1352347692738:dw|

  7. burhan101
    • 3 years ago
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    how did you get 1/3 ? :S

  8. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Vertical asymptotes are where the denominator is equal to zero.

  9. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    If you meant as your function, \[\large \frac{3x-1}{x}\] Then the vertical asymptote is at x=0. You only use long division to find slant asymptotes.

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