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Faman39

  • 2 years ago

A bakery charges $0.10 for a cookie that is 2 inches in diameter. If the price is proportional to the area, how much do they charge for an extra large cookie that is 10 inches in diameter? Assume that each cookie is shaped of a circle. $ 0.50 $ 1.00 $ 2.50 $ 12.50

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  1. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    @tkhunny can you able to help me with this ?

  2. tkhunny
    • 2 years ago
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    Here's the important part: "If the price is proportional to the area" Translate that Price = k*Area or just P = k*A. After that, there MUST be some given information. "$0.10 for a cookie that is 2 inches in diameter" There it is. Now what?

  3. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    2.50 ?

  4. tkhunny
    • 2 years ago
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    Don't do that. You just went magically from a partially set up problem statement to a solution out of the air. Show your work and think it through. We have: P = k*A. and "$0.10 for a cookie that is 2 inches in diameter" Thus: 0.10 = k*pi*(2/2)^2 = k(pi) ==> k = 1/(10pi) Now what?

  5. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    I m kinda confuse, you are saying multiply 2 three times then divide with 10, right?

  6. tkhunny
    • 2 years ago
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    No. You must read this problem very carefully. You are given the DIAMETER, but the relationship is with the AREA. You must convert. Diameter/2 = Radius. pi*Radius^2 = Area. It was mean of the question writer to use '2', since there were already two '2's in the development.

  7. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    so 2 is it right?

  8. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    oh ok thank you @tkhunny for helping, i will try another way

  9. tkhunny
    • 2 years ago
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    Once we ahve determiend 'k', we are nearly done. k = 1/(10pi) (1/10pi)*pi*(10/2)^2 = 25/10 = 2.50

  10. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    It should second one?

  11. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    i guess not

  12. tkhunny
    • 2 years ago
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    I don't understand the question. You just made me work the whole problem. It's 2.50.

  13. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    I am sorry i could not get on beginning for network prob, now i went from up, where explain all, now i got. thanks so much @tkhunny !

  14. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    So sorry for troubling :( i m really terrible

  15. tkhunny
    • 2 years ago
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    No name calling! Just spend the time it takes. You'll get it.

  16. Faman39
    • 2 years ago
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    I am really sorry for everything :(

  17. tkhunny
    • 2 years ago
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    Read some material on "Direct Proportion". It's not impossible to learn it.

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