Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

radh

  • 3 years ago

Find the area of the triangle with a = 4 feet, b = 8 feet, and c = 11 feet. Round to the nearest tenth.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Can you use the Heron's Formula?

  2. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    This is in relevance to the sides of a right triangle and the answer choices are: 12.3 ft2 9.3 ft2 14.3 ft2 13.3 ft2

  3. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Oh, a right triangle!

  4. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm not sure what that is.

  5. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Since 11 is the highest, it must be the hypotenuse. Which means that the other two are the base and height of the right triangle. Now, use the Area of a Triangle Formula. It is Area = Base*Height / 2

  6. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    See, that's where I got 16 (4/2*8), but that doesn't fit with the answer choices.

  7. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Then shouldn't it be 16? Are your options correct? =?

  8. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yeah, I know. But that's the only explanation since it's a right angled triangle.

  9. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yep. I posted exactly what the question said in the title and the answer choices.

  10. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Oh. But you did get what I was trying to say, right?

  11. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yeah, but. How would this work with Heron's Formula? (Maybe I've interpreted it wrong; this is a Trig course, so I assumed it would concern Right Triangles, but maybe not?)

  12. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    We use Heron's formula when we know all the three sides and the triangle isn't a right angled one. It's a very lengthy process, so we refrain from using it with right angled triangles as they can be better solved using the normal Triangle's Area formula.

  13. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    http://jwilson.coe.uga.edu/emt725/heron/image12.gif

  14. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh. If it helps, we were learning about the Law of Sines in this lesson. (That confused me all the more.) Nothing was said about Heron's Formula here or in subsequent lessons, so I think we can avoid that?

  15. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yeah, Heron's formula isn't required here if you've been learning Trigonometry.

  16. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    And the Law of Sines relates to angles/sides, but we're only given sides to work with here. Sigh!

  17. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Which angle of Tan is 1/2?

  18. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    There isn't one. *Sigh* We can't find the angles! Do you guys use a calculator? And even if we find the angles, what use is it?!

  19. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    We don't use Trigonometry for finding the area. It's only used to find the angles or sides of a right triangle.

  20. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    We can use calculators, but if I knew how to approach the problem I would've used it. :P

  21. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Honestly, I'm not sure. Thank you for your effort, though. I'm probably just going to guess and hope it doesn't account for much of my grade.

  22. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Hehe, we couldn't use calculators. T_T And I wish I remembered how Trigonometry. It was way back in the 9th grade I think. But really, are you sure the question isn't faulty?

  23. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    On my part, I'm sure it isn't faulty. On the teacher's fault, I'm not sure. I'll ask him about it tomorrow.

  24. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ah, alright. Good luck with that. =D On a personal note, which grade are you in?

  25. radh
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    10th. Pre-Calculus.

  26. Jas9420
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ha. Okay. =]

  27. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy