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Why substance dissolve?

Chemistry
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you said that How does a substance dissolve in a solvent? right @moongazer
are you there? @moongazer
by diffusion of particles. The solute particles, which are moving randomly, collide with the solvent particles, break off and diffuse throughout the mixture. The process continues until the substance is spread evenly throughout the mixture. This is called diffusion.

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@mayankdevnani I'm here now sorry for the late reply I'm doing something :)
Is that only the reason?
My teacher said there are three.
can i copy from my website
it takes much less time and you will get your answer sufficiently
can i?
What do you mean?
just copy and paste
This question is just for my notes so I think you can copy from your website. :) I'll just understand and summarize it. :)
no you will get your answer...plzz for your need
ok
plz wait
Let's consider the dissolving of an ionic substance, such as NaCl. The principles are the same for covalent substances such as sugar. There are edges and corners of the NaCl that are exposed to the solvent, let's say H2O. The dipole H2O is attracted to these areas where the atoms of Na+ and Cl- are sticking out. The water molecules cluster around the ions, hydrating (solvating) them as much as possible. The Heat of Hydration is exothermic, aiding in the breakdown of the ionic bond between the Na- and Cl-. Water molecules are doing the same thing to the Cl-, and with the Heat of Hydraation, the ions are being pulled apart, giving the water molecules a chance to sneak in behind them, further hydrating the ions. If enough water molecules get around the individual ions, they can pull it off from the crystal lattice, and completely surround the ions with concentric layers of waters of hydration. This reduces the effective charge on the ions, so they are not as attractive to the bulk of the remaining crystal lattice, and, due to kinteic energy of the water, are moved away from the lattice. Now more ions are exposed, and the process is repeated: solvation, heat of solvation, attractive forces of the solid being overcome by the solvent particles, as they cluster around solute particles. This process ties up a lot of H2O molecules, as they form the clusters of water around the solute particles, until there comes a situation where there is no more free H2O molecules, and the process appears to stop. This is "saturation", an equilibrium situation, where the ions return to the crystal at the same rate that other ions are leaving the crystal. If you heat the solution, the water particles have greater kinetic energy, and can smash into the undissolved solid with greater force, breaking attractive forces of the solute particles more easily. The Heat of Hydration is a major player in this process, and as more and more sloute particles are solvated, the leftover energy, leftover after the bonds of the crystal lattice have broken, may increase the temperature of the solution. If the Lattice Energy is greater than the Heat of Hydration, then the solution may become cold, or worse, the solute does not dissolve at all, or only a tiny bit. So, The Heat of Hydration provides the energy needed to disrupt attractive forces, and in ionic compounds, overcome the lattice energy, leading to each solute particle to be surrounded by layers and layers of solvent, which prevent the solute particle from rejoining the bulk of the solute.
n chemistry, a solution is a homogeneous mixture composed of two or more substances. In such a mixture, a solute is dissolved in another substance, known as a solvent. A common example is a solid, such as salt or sugar, dissolved in water, a liquid. Gases may dissolve in liquids, for example, carbon dioxide or oxygen in water. Liquids may dissolve in other liquids and gases always mix with other gases.[1] Examples of solid solutions are alloys, certain minerals and polymers containing plasticizers. The ability of one compound to dissolve in another compound is called solubility. The physical properties of compounds such as melting point and boiling point change when other compounds are added. Together they are called colligative properties. There are several ways to quantify the amount of one compound dissolved in the other compounds collectively called concentration. Examples include molarity, molality, and parts per million (ppm). Solutions should be distinguished from non-homogeneous mixtures such as colloids and suspension
ok @moongazer just read it and reply me soon

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