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babydoll332

  • 2 years ago

Convert the angle 30°37'11" to decimal degrees and round to the nearest hundredth of a degree. please explain completely how you got to it

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  1. babydoll332
    • 2 years ago
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    step by step please <3

  2. zordoloom
    • 2 years ago
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    IT would be be 30.62 degrees. You start by dividng 37 by 60. and 11 by 3600. Let me further explain

  3. ccappiello
    • 2 years ago
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    there are 60 minutes in a degree and sixty seconds in a minute, so there are 3600 seconds in a degree. 30 degrees + 37 minutes + 11 seconds is 30+37/60+11/3600 degrees.

  4. zordoloom
    • 2 years ago
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    It seems as if @ccappiello beat me the explanation.

  5. Varuns
    • 2 years ago
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    Degrees as it is. 1 degree is 60 minutes. So 37 minutes would be 37/60 degrees. 60 seconds is 1 minute. so 11 seconds is 11/60 minutes. 11/60 minutes is (11/60)/60 seconds

  6. babydoll332
    • 2 years ago
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    ok so i would 1st take the 30 degree

  7. babydoll332
    • 2 years ago
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    set it to 60 which would be

  8. babydoll332
    • 2 years ago
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    1800

  9. babydoll332
    • 2 years ago
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    wait im a little confused

  10. Varuns
    • 2 years ago
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    Use a calculator to find 37/60. Add (11/60)/60 to this result

  11. jim_thompson5910
    • 2 years ago
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    60 minutes = 1 degree 1 minute = 1/60 degrees 37 minutes = 37/60 degrees -------------------------------------- 60 seconds = 1 minute 3600 seconds = 60 minutes ...multiply both sides by 60 3600 seconds = 1 degree 1 second = 1/3600 degrees 11 seconds = 11/3600 degrees -------------------------------------- 30°37'11" = 30 degrees, 37 minutes, 11 seconds 30°37'11" = 30 degrees + 37 minutes + 11 seconds 30°37'11" = 30 degrees + 37/60 degrees + 11/3600 degrees 30°37'11" = (30 + 37/60 + 11/3600) degrees 30°37'11" = (30 + 0.61666666666667 + 0.00305555555556 ) degrees 30°37'11" = ( 30.6197222222222) degrees 30°37'11" = 30.62 degrees

  12. babydoll332
    • 2 years ago
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    i got it im sorry i was confused i watched the video thanks :)

  13. babydoll332
    • 2 years ago
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    i didnt understand the degrees then the min now i got :)))

  14. jim_thompson5910
    • 2 years ago
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    glad it's making sense now

  15. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    notice that this is almost like minutes and seconds used in time (probably not a coincidence, because the Babylonians did it this way thousands of years ago..) you must know that 30 minutes is 1/2 an hour. 30 minutes (of angle) are 1/2 a degree 15 minutes (of time) is a quarter hour (1/4 of an hour) and 15 minutes (of angle) is 1/4 of a degree (or 0.25 degrees using decimals)

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