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burhan101

  • 3 years ago

Common sense limit

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  1. burhan101
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\huge \lim_{x \rightarrow \infty} \frac{ \frac{ x^3 }{ x^3 } }{\frac{ x^2 }{ x^3 } -\frac{ 4 }{ x^3 } }\]

  2. zzr0ck3r
    • 3 years ago
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    0 I think

  3. yummydum
    • 3 years ago
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    yes @zzr0ck3r is correct...the graph is asymptotic and looks much as so:|dw:1352777876926:dw|

  4. yummydum
    • 3 years ago
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    so as the number of 'people' \(x\) increases, the amount of common sense \(y\) approaches \(0\)

  5. yummydum
    • 3 years ago
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    concluding that there will always be common sense but it decreases steadily to a very minute amount, yet never reaching extinction :)

  6. burhan101
    • 3 years ago
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    but then i can't have a slant asymptote right ? @yummydum

  7. burhan101
    • 3 years ago
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    @yummydum helllpp

  8. yummydum
    • 3 years ago
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    well that was just logic....if you solve the equation you mentioned you get a slant asymptote of \(y=x\) ... i would say to consider the original problem again because LOGICALLY speaking there is not a \(positive\) asymptote because that would mean that humans are have increasing common sense which evidently is absolutely NOT the case (just take a look around lol) ...hope im being helpful here :)

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