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richyw

  • 3 years ago

Find \(V_{out}\) of this amplifier...

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  1. richyw
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1352781695384:dw|

  2. Mathmuse
    • 3 years ago
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    1. The +ve input is tied to Vin, so the -ve input will attempt to maintain the same voltage. 2. This means that the voltage drop across, and thus the current through, the first 10k resistor is zero. 3. if there's no current through the 1st 10k resistor, then there is no current through the feedback resistor. 4. no current through the feedback resistor means no voltage drop. With no voltage drops the output will see Vin are you sure something isn't grounded in there somewhere?

  3. FrankJakob
    • 3 years ago
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    Should the + not go to ground? If so then it looks like an Op amp inverting amplifier. If resistance is very high ( I hope 10k is enough ) then: \[V _{out} \approx - V _{ in } \frac { R _{ f } }{ R _{ in } }\] here´s a link to info on similar amps: http://www.renesas.com/edge_ol/engineer/03/index.jsp

  4. FrankJakob
    • 3 years ago
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    The resistance Rf can also be named R2, it is the 2nd resistance from the left or the top one if you like.

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