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charlotteakina Group Title

do I use sin, tan, cos for this?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. Valkarie70 Group Title
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    cos

    • 2 years ago
  2. Valkarie70 Group Title
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    because the opposite is not defined you cant use sine, but you have adjacent and the hypotnuse which means you can use cosine

    • 2 years ago
  3. Valkarie70 Group Title
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    yep

    • 2 years ago
  4. nubeer Group Title
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    nop its base/hyp

    • 2 years ago
  5. Valkarie70 Group Title
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    but you dont have the base therefore you must use cosine

    • 2 years ago
  6. nubeer Group Title
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    so it should be 2.28/4.07

    • 2 years ago
  7. nubeer Group Title
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    well i think thats the way it should be done.. maybe you can ask someone else to confirm it.

    • 2 years ago
  8. nubeer Group Title
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    well no cos function will be use.. adjacent = 2.28 , hyp =4.07

    • 2 years ago
  9. nubeer Group Title
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    yes.

    • 2 years ago
  10. Valkarie70 Group Title
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    yes, so you cant do sine because it requires you use adjacent

    • 2 years ago
  11. nubeer Group Title
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    lol no.. its cosine.

    • 2 years ago
  12. nubeer Group Title
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    Some People Have Curly Brown Hair Through Proper Brushing. now just look first letter of each word. S=sin, P= perpendicular, H= Hyp, C=Cos , B= bAse, T=tan

    • 2 years ago
  13. nubeer Group Title
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    |dw:1352832846895:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  14. nubeer Group Title
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    that is a formula for making things easy.. mean when u use sin=perp/hyp cos= base /hyp , tan =perp/base

    • 2 years ago
  15. nubeer Group Title
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    base and hypotaneous will be the sides with angle.. and perpendicular is the side opposite of the angle on which we are working.

    • 2 years ago
  16. nubeer Group Title
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    |dw:1352832995681:dw| if we are working on this mark angle then your Hyp base and perp will be this.

    • 2 years ago
  17. nubeer Group Title
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    |dw:1352833051199:dw| if you are working on this angle then your hyp base and perp are this.

    • 2 years ago
  18. nubeer Group Title
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    hahah lol i am not crazy :P and yes thats an easy way to remember sides we have to take with cos sin and tan..

    • 2 years ago
  19. JakeV8 Group Title
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    Not yet... 0.560 that is the cosine of Angle A. Now you need to use "Inverse Cosine" to get angle A.

    • 2 years ago
  20. JakeV8 Group Title
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    do you have calculator? I am using the windows calculator... it has a button called "Inv" (for inverse), so I hit that button, then the "cosine" button. Actually, when I hit "Inv", then my cosine button turns to cos^-1 like: \[\cos ^{-1}\]

    • 2 years ago
  21. snowandsuch Group Title
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    cosine = a/c

    • 2 years ago
  22. JakeV8 Group Title
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    Yes, that's exactly right :) Nice work.

    • 2 years ago
  23. JakeV8 Group Title
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    If you have an angle, you can use the sine, cosine, and tangent ratios to solve for a missing side. If you don't have an angle shown, but you do have side lengths shown, you can use the same ratios, but then with inverse cosine, inverse sine, or inverse tangent to solve for the missing angle.

    • 2 years ago
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