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AdhaZeera

PLEASE HELP!!!

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. AdhaZeera
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    • one year ago
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  2. InYourHead
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    Hi! I'm sorry I've been away. Let's get started.

    • one year ago
  3. InYourHead
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    Okay. Let's look at the first question. What's the optimum pH for each enzyme? Take a look at the graph. Do you see how there are two lines that form hills, on that graph? Each hill is an enzyme. The solid hill is enzyme A, and the dotted hill is enzyme B. Now, look at the top of each hill. The top of each hill is the point where the enzymes work at their best. Question #1 calls it the "optimum," you see there. Look at the top of each hill. What are the pH numbers, for each of the highest points, on each hill? (You can see the pH number line, across the bottom of the graph.)

    • one year ago
  4. AdhaZeera
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    Enzyme A: 3 Enzyme B: 7

    • one year ago
  5. InYourHead
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    Yes! Close enough. Enzyme A looks to be about 3. Enzyme B actually looks like it's a liiiiittle higher than 7. Let's say 7.5, kay? So, let's look at the question again: What is the optimum pH for Enzyme A and Enzyme B? We have our answer now. The optimum pH for Enzyme A is 3 and the optimum pH for Enzyme B is 7.5. The "optimum pH" is the pH level where the enzymes work their best.

    • one year ago
  6. InYourHead
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    Okay, we're onto question #2. Take a look at the graph, with me. Across the bottom of the graph, we have the pH number line. Yes? And on the left side of the graph, we have the "rate of enzyme action," you see? Now, take a look at the graph, and find the place where the pH is 5. What do you notice about the rates, of each enzyme, when the pH is 5?

    • one year ago
  7. AdhaZeera
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    So for number 2 would it be Enzyme B works faster than Enzyme A when the pH is 5?

    • one year ago
  8. InYourHead
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    You think enzyme B works faster, at a 5 pH? Here, let me ask you this question.... What is the pH number where the two lines touch one another?

    • one year ago
  9. InYourHead
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    The two lines only touch one another, at one place, on the entire graph. What's the pH number, at that place?

    • one year ago
  10. AdhaZeera
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    Is it 5? On my paper it looks like 4.98.. I can't tell.

    • one year ago
  11. InYourHead
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    lol you're very precise! I like that. Yeah, it is 4.9822323 blah blah BUT we can round it up to 5. So we'll say 5.

    • one year ago
  12. InYourHead
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    Okay, so since the two lines touch one another at pH 5, then that means that when the pH is 5, they have the same exact rate of reaction. Do you get it?

    • one year ago
  13. AdhaZeera
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    Okay, lol :P and yes ^

    • one year ago
  14. InYourHead
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    And there's our answer for #2!

    • one year ago
  15. InYourHead
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    Now, we're on to question #3. The instructions told us that Enzyme A is in the stomach, and Enzyme B is in the intestines. Question #3 is asking us... What can you tell, about the pH of the stomach? Let's look at enzyme A, which is found in the stomach. We know that Enzyme A works its best, when the pH is 3. Right? So, would you agree that the pH level in the stomach is around 3?

    • one year ago
  16. AdhaZeera
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    Yes

    • one year ago
  17. InYourHead
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    Okay! That was easy. There's our answer for question #3. We can "infer" that the pH level in the stomach is around 3, because that is where Enzyme A is at its highest "rate of action."

    • one year ago
  18. InYourHead
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    Now, we're on to question #4. It's asking us what we can tell about the pH of the intestine. So NOW we have to look at Enzyme B. And we do the same thing we did with question #3, only this time, we're looking at Enzyme B. Do you think you have an answer?

    • one year ago
  19. AdhaZeera
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    The pH level in the intestine is around 7.5, because that is where Enzyme B is at its highest "rate of action." Right?

    • one year ago
  20. InYourHead
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    Yep! Perfect.

    • one year ago
  21. InYourHead
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    Okay, now we're on to question #5. It sounds more complicated than it is. Let me go over some facts that we already know: 1. Enzyme B is found in the intestine. 2. Enzyme B can ONLY work, when the pH is anywhere from 4 to 12. (You can take another look at the graph, and see that the dotted line only goes from 4 to 12.) 3. Enzyme B works its best, when the pH is 7.5. Do you understand all of these facts, so far?

    • one year ago
  22. AdhaZeera
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    Yes, btw, I'm sorry I replied late, my mother called me.

    • one year ago
  23. InYourHead
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    It's okay, I understand. Let's get back into question #5. The question is asking us to pretend that Enzyme A is in the intestines. Let me ask you two questions here: 1. What is the pH range where Enzyme A can work? (From what number, to what number?) 2. What is the "relative pH" of the intestine, that we've mentioned before?

    • one year ago
  24. AdhaZeera
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    1. Enzyme A can work from pH 0 to pH 6 2. The "relative pH" of the intestine is around 7.5.

    • one year ago
  25. InYourHead
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    Okay! So, if Enzyme A were in the intestine, would it work?

    • one year ago
  26. AdhaZeera
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    I'm not sure if I'm correct, but I'm saying no because the pH range where Enzyme A can work can't include the "relative pH" of the intestine which is 7.5.

    • one year ago
  27. InYourHead
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    Well that's right, actually. That's right on.

    • one year ago
  28. InYourHead
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    So we know that Enzyme A would not work, in the intestine. Because its working pH is 0 to 6. But the intestine's pH is 7.5. Too high. Now here's another fact: The digestive system needs working enzymes, in order to function. If the digestive system did not have working enzymes, then the digestive processes would stop. Does that make sense to you?

    • one year ago
  29. AdhaZeera
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    Yes

    • one year ago
  30. InYourHead
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    Okay. So let's look at question #5. It basically asks us... What do you think would happen to the digestive process, if Enzyme A were in the intestine? Do you think you know this one?

    • one year ago
  31. AdhaZeera
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    The digestive processes of the organism would stop. Right?

    • one year ago
  32. InYourHead
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    Yeah! That's right. Even better yet!....The digestive processes of the organism would not be able to work normally.

    • one year ago
  33. AdhaZeera
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    Thank you very much!! :)

    • one year ago
  34. InYourHead
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    You're welcome. =)

    • one year ago
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