Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Study23

  • 3 years ago

Logarithmic Derivatives?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Study23
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \(\ \Large f(\theta)=ln(cos\theta) ??\)

  2. nubeer
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ln(x) its derivative is (1/x)d/dx(x)

  3. nubeer
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    do the same with cosx

  4. Study23
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So use the Chain Rule?

  5. nubeer
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    hmm not so let me draw for u.

  6. nubeer
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1353048499720:dw| when u have to take derivatives of log functions this is formula u have to remember

  7. Study23
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ?

  8. nubeer
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1353048585263:dw|

  9. Study23
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So: |dw:1353048624893:dw| Or do I insert ln(cosx)?

  10. malical
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    So use the chain rule.

  11. nubeer
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    no just cos x

  12. Study23
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @malical after this step?

  13. malical
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes. Nubeer said no but his drawing said yes. That d/dx is taking another derivative of just cosx.

  14. Study23
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh okay, that's what I was thinking! Thanks for the help guys!

  15. nubeer
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yeah my bad.. sorry.

  16. Study23
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That's okay @nubeer. I'm appreciate that you tried to help! ;)

  17. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy