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Schrodinger

  • 3 years ago

I really have no clue how to solve this. "Given 360.5g of hot tea at 80 (C), what mass of ice at 0 (C) must be added to obtain iced tea at 10.5 (C)? The specific heat of the tea is 4.18, and the heat of fusion for ice is 6.01 kj/mol.

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  1. augusto.h
    • 3 years ago
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    (tea) mass*spec heat*T = (water) m*heat fusion

  2. Schrodinger
    • 3 years ago
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    Could you explain in words how you would arrive at the point/how i'm supposed to know that association? Thanks.

  3. augusto.h
    • 3 years ago
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    Actually I think there is something wrong because tea doesn't freeze at 10,5ºC - 1 atm. Unless the pressure is other. If so you will need the heat of fusion of tea as well.

  4. augusto.h
    • 3 years ago
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    Are you sure about the question?

  5. Schrodinger
    • 3 years ago
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    Let me double check: I'll directly copy/paste it to make sure there aren't any possible errors on my part: "Given 360.5 of hot tea at 80.0, what mass of ice at 0 must be added to obtain iced tea at 10.5? The specific heat of the tea is 4.18 , and for ice is +6.01 ."

  6. augusto.h
    • 3 years ago
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    Well I don't know. It seems to me there is lack of info. I would do this. Calculate the hole energy for the tea process. Q total = Q1 (T80->Tfusion) + Q2 (fusion) + Q3 (Tfusion->T10.5 if 10.5 is not the fusion T o f tea). Then you use this energy to calculate the mass of water Q = m*L where L is 6.01kj/mol

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