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TomLikesPhysics

  • 3 years ago

r(t)=(2t, wt, 4t) in cylindric coordinates. How do I find v(t)?

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  1. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    w is omega?

  2. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes

  3. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    I can't see how it is anything other than just differentiating wrt t

  4. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    I think the problem is that the unit vectors in cylindric coordinates also vary with time so it is not just v(t)=(2,w,4)

  5. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    so the directions here are\[\hat r,\hat\theta,\hat z\]I suppose, eh?

  6. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    right

  7. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    do you know the answer?

  8. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    No, however I just computed v(t)=(2, 2t*w, 4) but I don´t know if is correct or not.

  9. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    I also have no clue how I could ask wolfram alpha to check that.

  10. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    I used this formula but I am not entirely sure if this formula fits that problem.

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  11. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    I have never seen that formula, so I can't verify it...

  12. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    I thought this is a "simple" problem.^^

  13. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/system/files/coursematerial/2012/1115/77/CylCoords.pdf that formula you have seems to be right, though I can't seem to see where they get the extra rho from

  14. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    The extra rho comes from the derevative of the unit vector e in the direction of phi.

  15. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    ahh, okay, I had to read that sheet a but closer to get it thanks!

  16. TomLikesPhysics
    • 3 years ago
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    No problem, you´re welcome.

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