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brookester6

  • 3 years ago

what's the name for 2 pi

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  1. tkhunny
    • 3 years ago
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    "Steve"?

  2. brookester6
    • 3 years ago
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    NOO!!!!!!

  3. brookester6
    • 3 years ago
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    lol

  4. tkhunny
    • 3 years ago
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    Seriously, it's just \(2\pi\). Is there a need to call it something else?

  5. brookester6
    • 3 years ago
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    yes that's correct....look it up

  6. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Tau

  7. jim_thompson5910
    • 3 years ago
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    from these pages, it looks like tau, but not 100% on that myself http://constitutionclub.org/2011/07/02/even-math-is-changing/ http://math-blog.com/2010/06/28/forget-pi-here-comes-tau/

  8. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Also 'full circle' / '1 complete period of sine or cosine function,' etc.

  9. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    "360º" and so on, and so forth . . .

  10. tkhunny
    • 3 years ago
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    I still like "Steve".

  11. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    Steve is a good name too. I think Tau might have an advantage - still being a Greek letter and all that. You know how mathematical constants can be . . .

  12. tkhunny
    • 3 years ago
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    Why do we use \(2\pi r\) when \(\pi d\) is perfectly satisfactory - except that it is not a natural result of the calculus derivation. \(\dfrac{d}{dr}\pi r^{2} = 2\pi r\). It would be counter productive to replace either \(2r = d\) or \(2\pi = \tau\)

  13. CliffSedge
    • 3 years ago
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    How about angles around the unit circle? Quarter circle: π/2 or τ/4?

  14. Chlorophyll
    • 3 years ago
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    or total radian of the circle (?)

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